attraction
Magnetic Mag*net"ic, Magnetical Mag*net"ic*al, a. [L. magneticus: cf. F. magn['e]tique.] 1. Pertaining to the magnet; possessing the properties of the magnet, or corresponding properties; as, a magnetic bar of iron; a magnetic needle. [1913 Webster]

2. Of or pertaining to, or characterized by, the earth's magnetism; as, the magnetic north; the magnetic meridian. [1913 Webster]

3. Capable of becoming a magnet; susceptible to magnetism; as, the magnetic metals. [1913 Webster]

4. Endowed with extraordinary personal power to excite the feelings and to win the affections; attractive; inducing attachment. [1913 Webster]

She that had all magnetic force alone. --Donne. [1913 Webster]

5. Having, susceptible to, or induced by, animal magnetism, so called; hypnotic; as, a magnetic sleep. See {Magnetism}. [Archaic] [1913 Webster +PJC]

{Magnetic amplitude}, {attraction}, {dip}, {induction}, etc. See under {Amplitude}, {Attraction}, etc.

{Magnetic battery}, a combination of bar or horseshoe magnets with the like poles adjacent, so as to act together with great power.

{Magnetic compensator}, a contrivance connected with a ship's compass for compensating or neutralizing the effect of the iron of the ship upon the needle.

{Magnetic curves}, curves indicating lines of magnetic force, as in the arrangement of iron filings between the poles of a powerful magnet.

{Magnetic elements}. (a) (Chem. Physics) Those elements, as iron, nickel, cobalt, chromium, manganese, etc., which are capable or becoming magnetic. (b) (Physics) In respect to terrestrial magnetism, the declination, inclination, and intensity. (c) See under {Element}.

{Magnetic fluid}, the hypothetical fluid whose existence was formerly assumed in the explanations of the phenomena of magnetism; -- no longer considered a meaningful concept.

{Magnetic iron}, or {Magnetic iron ore}. (Min.) Same as {Magnetite}.

{Magnetic needle}, a slender bar of steel, magnetized and suspended at its center on a sharp-pointed pivot, or by a delicate fiber, so that it may take freely the direction of the magnetic meridian. It constitutes the essential part of a compass, such as the mariner's and the surveyor's.

{Magnetic poles}, the two points in the opposite polar regions of the earth at which the direction of the dipping needle is vertical.

{Magnetic pyrites}. See {Pyrrhotite}.

{Magnetic storm} (Terrestrial Physics), a disturbance of the earth's magnetic force characterized by great and sudden changes.

{Magnetic telegraph}, a telegraph acting by means of a magnet. See {Telegraph}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • attraction — [ atraksjɔ̃ ] n. f. • 1638; atration 1265; lat. attractio, de attrahere « tirer à soi » I ♦ Action d attirer; force qui attire. 1 ♦ (1688) Sc. Force qui attire les corps matériels entre eux. ⇒ gravitation. Loi de l attraction universelle (loi de… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Attraction — At*trac tion, n. [L. attractio: cf. F. attraction.] 1. (Physics) An invisible power in a body by which it draws anything to itself; the power in nature acting mutually between bodies or ultimate particles, tending to draw them together, or to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • attraction — attraction, affinity, sympathy are comparable when they denote the relationship between persons or things that are involuntarily or naturally drawn together and exert, to some degree, an influence over each other. Attraction implies the… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • attraction — Attraction. s. f. v. Action de ce qui attire. L attraction du fer par l aimant. quelle est la cause de cette attraction? cet onguent a fait une grande attraction …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • attraction — UK US /əˈtrækʃən/ noun [C] ► something that people come to see because they are interested in it: »The historic centre is one of the major visitor attractions of the city. → See also TOURIST ATTRACTION(Cf. ↑tourist attraction) …   Financial and business terms

  • attraction — ATTRACTION. s. f. Action d attirer, ou état de ce qui est attiré. L attraction du fer par l aimant. L attraction Neutonienne …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française 1798

  • attraction — late 14c., from Fr. attraction, from L. attractionem (nom. attractio) a drawing together, noun of action from pp. stem of attrahere (see ATTRACT (Cf. attract)). Originally a medical word, absorption by the body; meaning action of drawing to is… …   Etymology dictionary

  • Attraction — (v. lat.), 1) A. u. Attractionskraft (Phys.), Anziehung u. Anziehungskraft, s.d. Daher Attractionisten, Anhänger der Newtonschen Meinung, daß die Himmelskörper durch eine gegenseitige Anziehung getrieben werden; im Gegensatz derer, welche… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Attraction — Attraction, Anziehung, findet man in jeder Erscheinung der Körperwelt, wo Körper mit einer gewissen Kraft an einander gehalten werden. So spricht man auch von einer Anziehung der Himmelskörper unter einander, vermöge deren sie stets in gehörigen… …   Damen Conversations Lexikon

  • attraction — index affinity (regard), chain (nexus), decoy, desire, favor (partiality), incentive …   Law dictionary

  • attraction — [n] ability to draw attention; something that draws attention allure, allurement, appeal, attractiveness, bait, captivation, charm, chemistry, come on*, courting, draw, drawing power, enchantment, endearment, enthrallment, enticement, fascination …   New thesaurus

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