Mechanical maneuvers
Mechanical Me*chan"ic*al, a. [From {Mechanic}, a.] [1913 Webster] 1. Pertaining to, governed by, or in accordance with, mechanics, or the laws of motion; pertaining to the quantitative relations of force and matter on a macroscopic scale, as distinguished from {mental}, {vital}, {chemical}, {electrical}, {electronic}, {atomic} etc.; as, mechanical principles; a mechanical theory; especially, using only the interactions of solid parts against each other; as mechanical brakes, in contrast to {hydraulic} brakes. [1913 Webster +PJC]

2. Of or pertaining to a machine or to machinery or tools; made or formed by a machine or with tools; as, mechanical precision; mechanical products. [1913 Webster]

We have also divers mechanical arts. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

3. Done as if by a machine; uninfluenced by will or emotion; proceeding automatically, or by habit, without special intention or reflection; as, mechanical singing; mechanical verses; mechanical service. [1913 Webster]

4. Made and operated by interaction of forces without a directing intelligence; as, a mechanical universe. [1913 Webster]

5. Obtained by trial, by measurements, etc.; approximate; empirical. See the 2d Note under {Geometric}. [1913 Webster]

{Mechanical effect}, effective power; useful work exerted, as by a machine, in a definite time.

{Mechanical engineering}. See the Note under {Engineering}.

{Mechanical maneuvers} (Mil.), the application of mechanical appliances to the mounting, dismounting, and moving of artillery. --Farrow.

{Mechanical philosophy}, the principles of mechanics applied to the investigation of physical phenomena.

{Mechanical powers}, certain simple instruments, such as the lever and its modifications (the wheel and axle and the pulley), the inclined plane with its modifications (the screw and the wedge), which convert a small force acting through a great space into a great force acting through a small space, or vice versa, and are used separately or in combination.

{Mechanical solution} (Math.), a solution of a problem by any art or contrivance not strictly geometrical, as by means of the ruler and compasses, or other instruments. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Mechanical — Me*chan ic*al, a. [From {Mechanic}, a.] [1913 Webster] 1. Pertaining to, governed by, or in accordance with, mechanics, or the laws of motion; pertaining to the quantitative relations of force and matter on a macroscopic scale, as distinguished… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mechanical effect — Mechanical Me*chan ic*al, a. [From {Mechanic}, a.] [1913 Webster] 1. Pertaining to, governed by, or in accordance with, mechanics, or the laws of motion; pertaining to the quantitative relations of force and matter on a macroscopic scale, as… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mechanical engineering — Mechanical Me*chan ic*al, a. [From {Mechanic}, a.] [1913 Webster] 1. Pertaining to, governed by, or in accordance with, mechanics, or the laws of motion; pertaining to the quantitative relations of force and matter on a macroscopic scale, as… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mechanical philosophy — Mechanical Me*chan ic*al, a. [From {Mechanic}, a.] [1913 Webster] 1. Pertaining to, governed by, or in accordance with, mechanics, or the laws of motion; pertaining to the quantitative relations of force and matter on a macroscopic scale, as… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mechanical powers — Mechanical Me*chan ic*al, a. [From {Mechanic}, a.] [1913 Webster] 1. Pertaining to, governed by, or in accordance with, mechanics, or the laws of motion; pertaining to the quantitative relations of force and matter on a macroscopic scale, as… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mechanical solution — Mechanical Me*chan ic*al, a. [From {Mechanic}, a.] [1913 Webster] 1. Pertaining to, governed by, or in accordance with, mechanics, or the laws of motion; pertaining to the quantitative relations of force and matter on a macroscopic scale, as… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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