Longitude stars
Longitude Lon"gi*tude, n. [F., fr. L. longitudo, fr. longus long.] 1. Length; measure or distance along the longest line; -- distinguished from {breadth} or {thickness}; as, the longitude of a room; rare now, except in a humorous sense. --Sir H. Wotton. [1913 Webster]

The longitude of their cloaks. --Sir. W. Scott. [1913 Webster]

Mine [shadow] spindling into longitude immense. --Cowper. [1913 Webster]

2. (Geog.) The arc or portion of the equator intersected between the meridian of a given place and the meridian of some other place from which longitude is reckoned, as from Greenwich, England, or sometimes from the capital of a country, as from Washington or Paris. The longitude of a place is expressed either in degrees or in time; as, that of New York is 74[deg] or 4 h. 56 min. west of Greenwich. [1913 Webster]

3. (Astron.) The distance in degrees, reckoned from the vernal equinox, on the ecliptic, to a circle at right angles to the ecliptic passing through the heavenly body whose longitude is designated; as, the longitude of Capella is 79[deg]. [1913 Webster]

{Geocentric longitude} (Astron.), the longitude of a heavenly body as seen from the earth.

{Heliocentric longitude}, the longitude of a heavenly body, as seen from the sun's center.

{Longitude stars}, certain stars whose position is known, and the data in regard to which are used in observations for finding the longitude, as by lunar distances. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Longitude — Lon gi*tude, n. [F., fr. L. longitudo, fr. longus long.] 1. Length; measure or distance along the longest line; distinguished from {breadth} or {thickness}; as, the longitude of a room; rare now, except in a humorous sense. Sir H. Wotton. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Longitude by chronometer — Longitude by Chronometer, known by mariners as Long by Chron , is an astronomical navigation method of calculating an observer s position on earth. The method gives the observer a position line on which the observer is situated. Usually the… …   Wikipedia

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  • Geocentric longitude — Longitude Lon gi*tude, n. [F., fr. L. longitudo, fr. longus long.] 1. Length; measure or distance along the longest line; distinguished from {breadth} or {thickness}; as, the longitude of a room; rare now, except in a humorous sense. Sir H.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Heliocentric longitude — Longitude Lon gi*tude, n. [F., fr. L. longitudo, fr. longus long.] 1. Length; measure or distance along the longest line; distinguished from {breadth} or {thickness}; as, the longitude of a room; rare now, except in a humorous sense. Sir H.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • History of longitude — The history of longitude is a record of the effort, by navigators and scientists over several centuries, to discover a means of determining longitude. The measurement of longitude is important to both cartography and navigation. Historically, the …   Wikipedia

  • List of selected stars for navigation — The selected stars for navigation are often used for sextant observations. Fifty eight selected navigational stars are given a special status in the field of celestial navigation. Of the approximately 6,000 stars visible to the naked eye under… …   Wikipedia

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