wring

  • 1Wring — Wring, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Wrung}, Obs. {Wringed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Wringing}.] [OE. wringen, AS. wringan; akin to LG. & D. wringen, OHG. ringan to struggle, G. ringen, Sw. vr[ a]nga to distort, Dan. vringle to twist. Cf. {Wrangle}, {Wrench},… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2wring — [rıŋ] v past tense and past participle wrung [rʌŋ] [T] [: Old English; Origin: wringan] 1.) [always + adverb/preposition] to succeed in getting something from someone, but only after a lot of effort = ↑squeeze wring sth from/out of sb ▪ They are… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 3wring — [ rıŋ ] (past tense and past participle wrung [ rʌŋ ] ) verb transitive wring or wring out to twist and squeeze something in order to remove liquid from it: I ll just wring out this dress and hang it up. wring someone s neck used for emphasizing… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 4wring — O.E. wringan press, strain, wring, twist (class III strong verb; past tense wrang, pp. wrungen), from P.Gmc. *wrenganan (Cf. O.E. wringen to wring, press out, O.Fris. wringa, M.Du. wringhen, Du. wringen to wring, O.H.G. ringan to move to and fro …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 5wring — ► VERB (past and past part. wrung) 1) squeeze and twist to force liquid from. 2) break (an animal s neck) by twisting forcibly. 3) squeeze (someone s hand) tightly. 4) (wring from/out of) obtain with difficulty or effort. 5) cause great pain or… …

    English terms dictionary

  • 6Wring — Wring, v. i. To writhe; to twist, as with anguish. [1913 Webster] T is all men s office to speak patience To those that wring under the load of sorrow. Shak. [1913 Webster] Look where the sister of the king of France Sits wringing of her hands,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7Wring — Wring, n. A writhing, as in anguish; a twisting; a griping. [Obs.] Bp. Hall. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8wring — wring·er; wring; …

    English syllables

  • 9wring — [riŋ] vt. wrung or Rare wringed, wringing [ME wringen < OE wringan, to press, compress, strain, akin to Ger ringen, to struggle, wrestle < IE * wreng < base * wer , to turn, bend > WORM] 1. a) to squeeze, press, twist, or compress,… …

    English World dictionary

  • 10wring — index distill, exact, extort, press (constrain) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 11wring — [v] twist, contort choke, coerce, compress, draw out, exact, extort, extract, force, gouge, hurt, pain, pinch, pry, push, screw, shake down, squeeze, strain, strangle, throttle, turn, wrench, wrest; concepts 142,206,208 Ant. untwist …

    New thesaurus

  • 12wring — UK [rɪŋ] / US verb [transitive] Word forms wring : present tense I/you/we/they wring he/she/it wrings present participle wringing past tense wrung UK [rʌŋ] / US past participle wrung wring or wring out to twist and squeeze something in order to… …

    English dictionary

  • 13wring — [[t]rɪ̱ŋ[/t]] wrings, wringing, wrung 1) VERB If you wring something out of someone, you manage to make them give it to you even though they do not want to. [V n out of/from n] Buyers use different ruses to wring free credit out of their… …

    English dictionary

  • 14wring — verb past tense and past participle wrung, (T) 1 (always + adv/prep) to succeed in getting money, information, an agreement etc from someone, but only after a lot of effort: wring sth from sb/out of sb: We finally succeeded in wringing a… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 15wring — [c]/rɪŋ / (say ring) verb (wrung or, Rare, wringed, wringing) –verb (t) 1. to twist forcibly, as something flexible. 2. Also, wring out. to twist and compress, or compress without twisting, in order to force out moisture: to wring one s clothes… …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 16wring — verb (wrung; wringing) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English wringan; akin to Old High German ringan to struggle, Lithuanian rengtis to bend down, Old English wyrgan to strangle more at worry Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. to… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 17wring — v. 1) (d; tr.) ( to extract ) to wring from, out of (the police finally succeeded in wringing a confession from the prisoner) 2) (N; used with an adjective) ( to squeeze ) to wring a towel dry * * * [rɪŋ] out of (the police finally succeeded in… …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 18wring — [[t]rɪŋ[/t]] v. wrung, wring•ing, 1) to twist forcibly: She wrung the chicken s neck[/ex] 2) to twist or compress in order to force out water or other liquid (often fol. by out): to wring out a washcloth[/ex] 3) to extract by or as if by twisting …

    From formal English to slang

  • 19wring — v. & n. v.tr. (past and past part. wrung) 1 a squeeze tightly. b (often foll. by out) squeeze and twist esp. to remove liquid. 2 twist forcibly; break by twisting. 3 distress or torture. 4 extract by squeezing. 5 (foll. by out, from) obtain by… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 20wring — /ring/, v., wrung, wringing, n. v.t. 1. to twist forcibly: He wrung the chicken s neck. 2. to twist and compress, or compress without twisting, in order to force out water or other liquid (often fol. by out): to wring clothes. 3. to extract or… …

    Universalium