woful

  • 1 Woful — Woeful Woe ful, Woful Wo ful, a. 1. Full of woe; sorrowful; distressed with grief or calamity; afflicted; wretched; unhappy; sad. [1913 Webster] How many woeful widows left to bow To sad disgrace! Daniel. [1913 Webster] 2. Bringing calamity,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 woful — adjective see woeful …

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  • 3 woful — (Roget s Thesaurus II) adjective See woeful …

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  • 4 woful — woe·ful || wəʊfÊŠl adj. sorrowful, unhappy, wretched, despondent; tragic; pitiable; poor …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 5 woful — a. [Written also Woeful.] 1. Sorrowful, distressed, sad, afflicted, unhappy, grieved, anguished, agonized, miserable, piteous, wretched, melancholy, disconsolate, troubled, burdened. See woe begone. 2. Grievous, distressing, afflicting,… …

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  • 6 woful — wo·ful …

    English syllables

  • 7 woful — adjective see woeful * * * woeˈful or wōˈful adjective 1. Sorrowful or afflicted 2. Bringing misery or calamity 3. Deplorable 4. Wretched, paltry • • • Main Entry: ↑woe …

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  • 8 Lugubrious — Lu*gu bri*ous, a. [L. lugubris, fr. lugere to mourn; cf. Gr. lygro s sad, Skr. ruj to break.] Mournful; indicating sorrow, often ridiculously or feignedly; doleful; woful; pitiable; as, a whining tone and a lugubrious look. [1913 Webster]… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 9 Lugubriously — Lugubrious Lu*gu bri*ous, a. [L. lugubris, fr. lugere to mourn; cf. Gr. lygro s sad, Skr. ruj to break.] Mournful; indicating sorrow, often ridiculously or feignedly; doleful; woful; pitiable; as, a whining tone and a lugubrious look. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 10 Lugubriousness — Lugubrious Lu*gu bri*ous, a. [L. lugubris, fr. lugere to mourn; cf. Gr. lygro s sad, Skr. ruj to break.] Mournful; indicating sorrow, often ridiculously or feignedly; doleful; woful; pitiable; as, a whining tone and a lugubrious look. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 11 Sonneteer — Son net*eer , n. A composer of sonnets, or small poems; a small poet; usually in contempt. [1913 Webster] What woful stuff this madrigal would be In some starved hackney sonneteer or me! Pope. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 12 Woeful — Woe ful, Woful Wo ful, a. 1. Full of woe; sorrowful; distressed with grief or calamity; afflicted; wretched; unhappy; sad. [1913 Webster] How many woeful widows left to bow To sad disgrace! Daniel. [1913 Webster] 2. Bringing calamity, distress,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 13 woeful — also woful adjective Date: 14th century 1. full of woe ; grievous < woeful prophecies > 2. involving or bringing woe 3. lamentably bad or serious ; deplorable < woeful ignorance > • woefully …

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  • 14 Rhyme royal — (or Rime royal) is a rhyming stanza form that was introduced into English poetry by Geoffrey Chaucer. Contents 1 Form 2 History 3 Some examples 4 …

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  • 15 American and British English spelling differences — Spelling differences redirects here. For other uses, see Category:Language comparison. For guidelines on dialects and spelling in the English language version of Wikipedia, see Wikipedia:Manual of Style#National varieties of English. Differences… …

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  • 16 Bramimonde — In the Chanson de Roland , Bramimonde is the Queen of Zaragoza and wife of Marsilion and mother of Jurfaleu the Blond.Bramimonde is introduced as an unwavering supporter of the Saracens, her husband and the betrayal of Roland; going so far as to… …

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  • 17 Lumman Tige Srafain — Lumman Tige Srafáin is a poem in Dinnsenchas Erann explaining the place legend of Straffan, a town and parish in County Kildare, Republic of Ireland situated on the banks of the River Liffey 25km upstream from the Irish capital Dublin, a place… …

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  • 18 woeful — woefully, adv. woefulness, n. /woh feuhl/, adj. 1. full of woe; wretched; unhappy: a woeful situation. 2. affected with, characterized by, or indicating woe: woeful melodies. 3. of wretched quality; sorry; poor: a woeful collection of paintings.… …

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  • 19 Nicholas Bernard — (died 1661) was an English clergyman and pamphleteer. A dean in Ireland at the time of the Rebellion of 1641, he wrote descriptions of current events. He was also the biographer of James Ussher. Life He was born around 1600, and educated at… …

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  • 20 woeful — I woebegone, woeful (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) adj. sorrowful, unhappy. See dejection. II (Roget s IV) modif. Syn. full of woe, mournful, miserable; see pitiful 1 , sorry 1 . III (Roget s 3 Superthesaurus) a. see woebegone IV (Roget …

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