witless

  • 1 Witless — Wit less, a. Destitute of wit or understanding; wanting thought; hence, indiscreet; not under the guidance of judgment. Witless bravery. Shak. [1913 Webster] A witty mother! witless else her son. Shak. [1913 Webster] Witless pity breedeth… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 witless — O.E. witleas; see WIT (Cf. wit) + LESS (Cf. less). Phrase scared witless attested from 1975 …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 3 witless — index fatuous, irrational, obtuse, opaque Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 4 witless — [adj] foolish absurd, asinine, birdbrained*, brainless, cockamamy*, crazy, daffy*, doltish*, dotty*, dumb, feebleminded*, half baked*, half witted*, harebrained*, idiotic, ill advised, irrational, jerky*, kooky*, loony*, ludicrous, lunatic, mad,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 5 witless — ► ADJECTIVE ▪ foolish; stupid. DERIVATIVES witlessly adverb witlessness noun …

    English terms dictionary

  • 6 witless — [wit′lis] adj. lacking wit or intelligence; foolish witlessly adv. witlessness n …

    English World dictionary

  • 7 witless — wit|less [ wıtləs ] adjective 1. ) LITERARY very silly or stupid: This witless reaction has obscured the real problem. 2. ) an old word meaning mentally ill scare someone witless to make someone feel very frightened …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 8 witless — [[t]wɪ̱tləs[/t]] ADJ (disapproval) If you describe something or someone as witless, you mean that they are very foolish or stupid. ...a witless, nasty piece of journalism. Syn: mindless, stupid …

    English dictionary

  • 9 witless — adjective 1 not very intelligent or sensible; silly: if I catch the witless yobs who did this 2 scare sb witless to make someone very frightened witlessly adverb witlessness noun (U) …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 10 witless — UK [ˈwɪtləs] / US adjective 1) literary very silly or stupid This witless reaction has obscured the real problem. 2) an old word meaning mentally ill • scare someone witless …

    English dictionary

  • 11 witless — adjective Date: before 12th century 1. destitute of wit or understanding ; foolish 2. mentally deranged ; crazy < drive one witless with anxiety William Styron > • witlessly adverb • witlessness noun …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 12 witless — wit|less [ˈwıtləs] adj 1.) be scared witless feeling very frightened 2.) not very intelligent or sensible = ↑stupid >witlessly adv >witlessness n [U] …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 13 witless — witlessly, adv. witlessness, n. /wit lis/, adj. lacking wit or intelligence; stupid; foolish. [bef. 1000; ME; OE witleas. See WIT1, LESS] * * * …

    Universalium

  • 14 witless — adjective Destitute of wit or understanding; wanting thought; hence, indiscreet; not under the guidance of judgment …

    Wiktionary

  • 15 witless — Synonyms and related words: a stranger to, abnormal, apish, asinine, asleep, batty, bedlamite, befooled, beguiled, bereft of reason, besotted, blind to, brainless, brainsick, buffoonish, caught napping, cockeyed, crackbrained, cracked, crazed,… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 16 witless — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) adj. senseless, brainless; silly, foolish, pointless, idiotic, moronic, imbecilic, dumb (sl.); half witted, dull, thick, stupid, scatterbrained, muddle headed, dopy (sl.). See ignorance. II (Roget s 3… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 17 witless — adj. == mad. RG. 216; at a loss. Pilate, 242 …

    Oldest English Words

  • 18 witless — wit·less || wɪtlɪs adj. lacking intelligence, silly, stupid, foolish, doltish …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 19 witless — adjective foolish; stupid. Derivatives witlessly adverb witlessness noun …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 20 witless — a. Silly, foolish, stupid, dull, shallow, senseless, obtuse, daft (Scotch), unintelligent, feeble witted, short witted, half witted, dull witted, muddy headed, muddy brained, slow of apprehension, fat witted …

    New dictionary of synonyms