wayward

  • 1 Wayward — Way ward, a. [OE. weiward, for aweiward, i. e., turned away. See {Away}, and { ward}.] Taking one s own way; disobedient; froward; perverse; willful. [1913 Webster] My wife is in a wayward mood. Shak. [1913 Webster] Wayward beauty doth not fancy… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 wayward — [wā′wərd] adj. [ME weiward, aphetic for aweiward: see AWAY & WARD] 1. insistent upon having one s own way, contrary to others advice, wishes, or orders; headstrong, willful, disobedient, delinquent, etc. 2. conforming to no fixed rule or pattern; …

    English World dictionary

  • 3 wayward — index disobedient, disorderly, dissolute, eccentric, froward, insubordinate, intractable, lawless, opposite …

    Law dictionary

  • 4 wayward — late 14c. aphetic shortening of aweiward turned away, from AWAY (Cf. away) + WARD (Cf. ward) …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 5 wayward — perverse, froward, restive, *contrary, balky Analogous words: *insubordinate, contumacious, rebellious: refractory, recalcitrant, intractable, headstrong, *unruly: capricious, *inconstant, fickle, unstable Contrasted words: amenable, tractable, * …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 6 wayward — [adj] contrary, unmanageable aberrant, arbitrary, balky, capricious, changeable, contumacious, cross grained, delinquent, disobedient, disorderly, errant, erratic, fickle, flighty, fractious, froward, headstrong, immoral, inconstant, incorrigible …

    New thesaurus

  • 7 wayward — ► ADJECTIVE ▪ self willed and unpredictable; perverse. DERIVATIVES waywardly adverb waywardness noun. ORIGIN shortening of obsolete awayward «turned away» …

    English terms dictionary

  • 8 wayward — waywardly, adv. waywardness, n. /way weuhrd/, adj. 1. turned or turning away from what is right or proper; willful; disobedient: a wayward son; wayward behavior. 2. swayed or prompted by caprice; capricious: a wayward impulse; to be wayward in… …

    Universalium

  • 9 wayward — /ˈweɪwəd / (say waywuhd) adjective 1. turned or turning away from what is right or proper; perverse: a wayward son. 2. swayed or prompted by caprice, or capricious: a wayward fancy; a wayward impulse. 3. turning or changing irregularly; irregular …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 10 wayward — way|ward [ weıwərd ] adjective 1. ) a wayward child or someone with wayward behavior is difficult to control and does unexpected things 2. ) not organized or controlled in the right way: wayward thoughts …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 11 wayward — UK [ˈweɪwə(r)d] / US [ˈweɪwərd] adjective 1) a wayward child or someone with wayward behaviour is difficult to control and does unexpected things 2) not organized or controlled in the right way wayward thoughts …

    English dictionary

  • 12 wayward — adjective Etymology: Middle English, short for awayward turned away, from away, adverb + ward Date: 14th century 1. following one s own capricious, wanton, or depraved inclinations ; ungovernable < a wayward child > 2. following no clear… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 13 wayward — [[t]we͟ɪwə(r)d[/t]] ADJ GRADED: usu ADJ n If you describe a person or their behaviour as wayward, you mean that they behave in a selfish, bad, or unpredictable way, and are difficult to control. ...wayward children with a history of severe… …

    English dictionary

  • 14 wayward — way•ward [[t]ˈweɪ wərd[/t]] adj. 1) disregarding or rejecting what is right or proper; willful; disobedient 2) prompted by caprice; capricious: a wayward impulse[/ex] 3) changing unpredictably; erratic: a wayward breeze[/ex] • Etymology:… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 15 wayward — adj. Wayward is used with these nouns: ↑child, ↑genius, ↑shot …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 16 wayward — way|ward [ˈweıwəd US wərd] adj [Date: 1300 1400; Origin: awayward turned away (13 16 centuries), from away + ward] behaving badly, in a way that is difficult to control ▪ a wayward teenager >waywardness n [U] …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 17 wayward — adjective behaving in a way that is different from other people and that causes problems: a wayward teenager waywardly adverb waywardness noun (U) …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 18 wayward — adjective a wayward child Syn: willful, headstrong, stubborn, obstinate, obdurate, perverse, contrary, disobedient, insubordinate, undisciplined; rebellious, defiant, uncooperative, recalcitrant, unruly, wild, unmanageable, erratic; …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 19 wayward — adjective /ˈweɪwɚd/ a) given to wilful, perverse deviation from the expected norm; tending to stray b) obstinate, contrary and unpredictable …

    Wiktionary

  • 20 wayward — Synonyms and related words: Adamic, Paphian, adrift, afloat, alternating, amorphous, arbitrary, backsliding, balky, cantankerous, capricious, carnal, chambering, changeable, changeful, contrary, cranky, cross grained, crotchety, desultory,… …

    Moby Thesaurus