vitiation

  • 1 Vitiation — Vi ti*a tion, n. [L. vitiatio.] The act of vitiating, or the state of being vitiated; depravation; corruption; invalidation; as, the vitiation of the blood; the vitiation of a contract. [1913 Webster] The vitiation that breeds evil acts. G. Eliot …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 vitiation — index annulment, contaminate, damage, debauchment, fault (weakness), invalidity, perversion, rescision …

    Law dictionary

  • 3 vitiation — noun nullification by the destruction of the legal force; rendering null the vitiation of the contract • Derivationally related forms: ↑vitiate • Hypernyms: ↑nullification, ↑override …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 4 vitiation — noun see vitiate …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 5 vitiation — See vitiable. * * * …

    Universalium

  • 6 vitiation — noun a) a reduction in the value, or an impairment in the quality of something b) moral corruption …

    Wiktionary

  • 7 vitiation — A change that impairs utility or reduces efficiency. [L. vitiatio fr. vitio, pp. vitiatus, to corrupt, fr. vitium, vice] * * * vi·ti·a·tion (vish″e aґshən) [L. vitiatio] impairment of efficiency; the perversion of any process so as to… …

    Medical dictionary

  • 8 vitiation — vi·ti·a·tion || ‚vɪʃɪ eɪʃn n. weakening; corruption …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 9 vitiation — n. Deterioration, degeneration, debasement, degradation, degeneracy, depravation, impairment, injury, corruption, perversion, pollution, prostitution, invalidation …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 10 vitiation — n 1. impairment, reduction, devaluation, deterioration, depreciation, lowering, descent, fall, detriment; adulteration, pollution, contamination, infection, dilution, poisoning. 2. debasement, abasement, degradation, degeneration, decadence;… …

    A Note on the Style of the synonym finder

  • 11 vitiation — vi·ti·a·tion …

    English syllables

  • 12 vitiation — See: vitiate …

    English dictionary

  • 13 vitiate — vitiation, n. vitiator, n. /vish ee ayt /, v.t., vitiated, vitiating. 1. to impair the quality of; make faulty; spoil. 2. to impair or weaken the effectiveness of. 3. to debase; corrupt; pervert. 4. to make legally defective or invalid;… …

    Universalium

  • 14 Depravity — De*prav i*ty, n. [From {Deprave}: cf. L. pravitas crookedness, perverseness.] The state of being depraved or corrupted; a vitiated state of moral character; general badness of character; wickedness of mind or heart; absence of religious feeling… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 15 Total depravity — Depravity De*prav i*ty, n. [From {Deprave}: cf. L. pravitas crookedness, perverseness.] The state of being depraved or corrupted; a vitiated state of moral character; general badness of character; wickedness of mind or heart; absence of religious …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 16 vitiate — transitive verb ( ated; ating) Etymology: Latin vitiatus, past participle of vitiare, from vitium fault, vice Date: 1534 1. to make faulty or defective ; impair < the comic impact is vitiated by obvious haste William Styron > 2. to debase in… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 17 Sound film — …

    Wikipedia

  • 18 Datu — For town in Nepal, see Datu, Nepal. A pre colonial couple belonging to the Datu or nobility caste as depicted in the Boxer Codex of the 16th Century. Datu is the title for tribal chiefs, sovereign princes, and monarchs[1] in the Visayas …

    Wikipedia

  • 19 Sound recording and reproduction — Sound recorder redirects here. For the audio recording program computer software, see Sound Recorder (Windows). Sound recording and reproduction is an electrical or mechanical inscription and re creation of sound waves, such as spoken voice,… …

    Wikipedia

  • 20 Names of the Greeks — History of Greece This article is part of a series …

    Wikipedia


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