underestimate

  • 1underestimate — un‧der‧es‧ti‧mate [ˌʌndərˈestmeɪt] verb [transitive] to think that something is smaller than it really is: • We underestimated our operating costs. • The official statistics seriously underestimate actual unemployment. underestimate… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 2Underestimate — Un der*es ti*mate, v. t. To set to? low a value on; to estimate below the truth. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3Underestimate — Un der*es ti*mate, n. The act of underestimating; too low an estimate. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4underestimate — I verb belittle, deprecate, depreciate, detract from, discredit, disesteem, disparage, do scant justice to, make light of, minimize, minoris aestimare, minoris facere, misjudge, misprize, rate below the true value, rate too low, run down, set at… …

    Law dictionary

  • 5underestimate — (v.) 1812, to estimate at too low an amount, from UNDER (Cf. under) + ESTIMATE (Cf. estimate) (v.). Meaning to rank too low, undervalue is recorded from 1850. Related: Underestimated; underestimating …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 6underestimate — [v] minimize; rate too low belittle, deprecate, depreciate, disesteem, disparage, make light of*, miscalculate, miscarry, not do justice*, put down*, sell short*, slight, think too little of*, underrate, undervalue; concepts 12,54,764 Ant.… …

    New thesaurus

  • 7underestimate — ► VERB 1) estimate (something) to be smaller or less important than it really is. 2) regard (someone) as less capable than they really are. ► NOUN ▪ an estimate that is too low. DERIVATIVES underestimation noun …

    English terms dictionary

  • 8underestimate — [un΄dər es′tə māt΄; ] for n. [, un΄dər es′təmit] vt. underestimated, underestimating to set too low an estimate on or for n. an estimate that is too low underestimation n …

    English World dictionary

  • 9underestimate — [[t]ʌ̱ndəre̱stɪmeɪt[/t]] underestimates, underestimating, underestimated 1) VERB If you underestimate something, you do not realize how large or great it is or will be. [V n] None of us should ever underestimate the degree of difficulty women… …

    English dictionary

  • 10underestimate — I UK [ˌʌndərˈestɪˌmeɪt] / US verb [transitive] Word forms underestimate : present tense I/you/we/they underestimate he/she/it underestimates present participle underestimating past tense underestimated past participle underestimated * 1) to think …

    English dictionary

  • 11underestimate — {{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}} (also underestimation) noun ADJECTIVE ▪ gross, serious, significant ▪ The official figures are a gross underestimate of the true number. ▪ slight PREPOSITION …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 12underestimate — un|der|es|ti|mate1 [ˌʌndərˈestımeıt] v 1.) [I and T] to think or guess that something is smaller, cheaper, easier etc than it really is ≠ ↑overestimate underestimate how/what ▪ We underestimated how long it would take to get there. underestimate… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 13underestimate — un|der|es|ti|mate1 [ ,ʌndər estı,meıt ] verb transitive * 1. ) to think that someone has less power or ability than they really do: Their big mistake was to underestimate their opponents skill in handling the news media. 2. ) to think or guess… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 14underestimate — 1 verb 1 (I, T) to think that something is smaller, cheaper, less important etc than it really is: People often underestimate the importance of training. 2 (T) to think that someone is not as good, clever, or skilful, as they really are: Don t… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 15underestimate — overestimate, underestimate Because these words are often used in negative or quasi negative contexts, there is a danger of losing track of logic and using the wrong word, usually underestimate for overestimate. In a wallchart on the plays of… …

    Modern English usage

  • 16underestimate — transitive verb Date: 1792 1. to estimate as being less than the actual size, quantity, or number 2. to place too low a value on ; underrate • underestimate noun • underestimation noun …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 17underestimate — [ˌʌndərˈestɪˌmeɪt] verb [T] 1) to think that someone has less power or ability than they really do 2) to think or guess that something is smaller, less important etc than it really is Ant: overestimate underestimate [ˌʌndərˈestɪmət] noun [C] …

    Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • 18underestimate — noun /ˌʌndər estɪmət/ an estimate which is less than the actual figure ● The figure of £50,000 in turnover was a considerable underestimate. ■ verb /ˌʌndər estɪmeɪt/ to think that something is smaller or not as bad as it really is ● They… …

    Dictionary of banking and finance

  • 19underestimate — underestimation, n. v. /un deuhr es teuh mayt /; n. /un deuhr es teuh mit, mayt /, v., underestimated, underestimating, n. v.t. 1. to estimate at too low a value, rate, or the like. v.i. 2. to make an estimate lower than that which would be… …

    Universalium

  • 20underestimate — 1. verb /ʌndɚˈɛs.tɨ.meɪt,ʌndɚˈɛs.tɨ.mɨt,ʌndɚˈɛs.tɨ.mət/ To perceive (someone or something) as having a lower value, quantity, worth etc. than what it actually has. Syn: misunderestimate, misjudge …

    Wiktionary