umbrage

  • 1Umbrage — Um brage (?; 48), n. [F. ombrage shade, suspicion, umbrage, L. umbraticus belonging to shade, fr. umbra a shade. Cf. {Umber}, {Umbratic}.] 1. Shade; shadow; obscurity; hence, that which affords a shade, as a screen of trees or foliage. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2umbrage — (n.) early 15c., shadow, shade, from M.Fr. ombrage shade, shadow, from L. umbraticum, neut. of umbraticus of or pertaining to shade, from umbra shade, shadow, from PIE root *andho blind, dark (Cf. Skt. andha , Avestan anda blind, dark ). Many… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 3umbrage — ► NOUN (in phrase take umbrage) ▪ offence or annoyance. ORIGIN originally in the sense «shade or shadow», later «shadowy outline» and «ground for suspicion»: from Latin umbra shade …

    English terms dictionary

  • 4umbrage — [um′brij] n. [ME < OFr < L umbraticus, of shade < umbra, a shade, shadow] 1. [Obs. or Old Poet.] shade; shadow 2. foliage, considered as shade giving 3. offense or resentment [to take umbrage at a remark] 4. Archaic a semblance or… …

    English World dictionary

  • 5umbrage — I noun acrimony, alienation, anger, animosity, annoyance, bad blood, bile, bitterness, choler, disaffection, discord, dislike, displeasure, dissatisfaction, dudgeon, enmity, estrangement, grudge, hatred, hostility, ill humor, ill will,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 6umbrage — 1 shadow, *shade, umbra, penumbra, adumbration 2 *offense, resentment, pique, dudgeon, huff Analogous words: annoyance, vexation, irking (see corresponding verbs at ANNOY): irritation, exasperation, provocation, nettling (see corresponding verbs… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 7umbrage — [n] personal displeasure anger, annoyance, chagrin, exasperation, fury, grudge, high dudgeon*, huff, indignation, injury, ire, irking, irritation, miff*, nettling*, offense, pique, provoking, rage, resentment, sense of injury, vexation, wrath;… …

    New thesaurus

  • 8umbrage — [15] Umbrage is one of a group of English words that go back ultimately to Latin umbra ‘shadow’. Indeed, it was originally used for ‘shade, shadow’ in English: ‘the light, and also … the false umbrage which the moon doth show forth’, Betham,… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 9umbrage — [15] Umbrage is one of a group of English words that go back ultimately to Latin umbra ‘shadow’. Indeed, it was originally used for ‘shade, shadow’ in English: ‘the light, and also … the false umbrage which the moon doth show forth’, Betham,… …

    Word origins

  • 10umbrage — /um brij/, n. 1. offense; annoyance; displeasure: to feel umbrage at a social snub; to give umbrage to someone; to take umbrage at someone s rudeness. 2. the slightest indication or vaguest feeling of suspicion, doubt, hostility, or the like. 3.… …

    Universalium

  • 11umbrage — [ ʌmbrɪdʒ] noun 1》 offence or annoyance. 2》 archaic shade or shadow, especially as cast by trees. Derivatives umbrageous adjective Word History Umbrage is first recorded in the late Middle Ages. It entered English from Old French, and comes from… …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 12umbrage — 1. noun /ˈʌm.brɪdʒ/ a) Feeling of anger or annoyance caused by something offensive. He took umbrage at something or other, that muchinjured but on the whole eventempered person declared, I let slip. b) Feeling of doubt. [...] but in the verity of …

    Wiktionary

  • 13umbrage — um|brage [ ʌmbrıdʒ ] noun take umbrage (at something) to be offended by something: They re liable to take umbrage if we don t invite them …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 14umbrage — n. offense 1) to give umbrage 2) to take umbrage at …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 15umbrage — [[t]ʌ̱mbrɪʤ[/t]] PHRASE: V inflects If you say that a person takes umbrage, you mean that they are upset or offended by something that someone says or does to them, often without much reason. [FORMAL] He takes umbrage against anyone who… …

    English dictionary

  • 16umbrage — noun take umbrage (at) to be offended by something that someone has done or said: James took umbrage at Mrs Dubose s remarks …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 17umbrage — UK [ˈʌmbrɪdʒ] / US noun take umbrage (at something) to be offended by something They re liable to take umbrage if we don t invite them …

    English dictionary

  • 18umbrage — noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French, from Latin umbraticum, neuter of umbraticus of shade, from umbratus, past participle of umbrare to shade, from umbra shade, shadow; akin to Lithuanian unksmė shadow Date: 15th century 1. shade,… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 19umbrage — um|brage [ˈʌmbrıdʒ] n [Date: 1400 1500; : Old French; Origin: Latin umbraticum shade , from umbrare to shade , from umbra shade, shadow ] take umbrage (at sth) to be offended by something that someone has done or said, often without good reason …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 20umbrage — take umbrage …

    Thesaurus of popular words