tear+a+passion+to+tatters

  • 1 Tatter — Tat ter, n. [Icel. t[ o]tur, t[ o]ttur, pl. t[ o]trar, ?[ o]ttrar; cf. Norw. totra, pl. totror, LG. taltern tatters. [root]240.] A rag, or a part torn and hanging; chiefly used in the plural. [1913 Webster] Tear a passion to tatters, to very rags …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 robustious — adjective boisterous O, it offends me to the soul to hear a robustious periwig pated fellow tear a passion to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings, who for the most part are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb shows… …

    Wiktionary

  • 3 rant — I. v. n. Spout, declaim (boisterously), rave (in high sounding phrases), vociferate, mouth, tear a passion to tatters. II. n. Fustian, bombast, rhodomontade, exaggeration, boisterous declamation …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 4 ro|bus´tious|ness — ro|bus|tious «roh BUHS chuhs», adjective. 1. rough; rude; boisterous: »Oh, it offends me to the soul to hear a robustious periwig pated fellow tear a passion to tatters... (Shakespeare). 2. robust; strong; stout …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 5 ro|bus´tious|ly — ro|bus|tious «roh BUHS chuhs», adjective. 1. rough; rude; boisterous: »Oh, it offends me to the soul to hear a robustious periwig pated fellow tear a passion to tatters... (Shakespeare). 2. robust; strong; stout …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 6 ro|bus|tious — «roh BUHS chuhs», adjective. 1. rough; rude; boisterous: »Oh, it offends me to the soul to hear a robustious periwig pated fellow tear a passion to tatters... (Shakespeare). 2. robust; strong; stout …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 7 performing arts — arts or skills that require public performance, as acting, singing, or dancing. [1945 50] * * * ▪ 2009 Introduction Music Classical.       The last vestiges of the Cold War seemed to thaw for a moment on Feb. 26, 2008, when the unfamiliar strains …

    Universalium

  • 8 Shakespeare in performance — Numerous performances of William Shakespeare s plays have occurred since the end of the 16th century. While Shakespeare was alive, many of his greatest plays were performed by the Lord Chamberlain s Men and King s Men acting companies at the… …

    Wikipedia