tack+ship

  • 1 tack´er — tack1 «tak», noun, verb. –n. 1. a short, sharp pointed nail or pin with a flat, broad head: »We bought some carpet tacks. 2. a long, loose stitch used as a temporary fastening before final sewing. 3. any very slight, loose fastening: »hanging by… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 2 tack — I. v. a. 1. Fasten (slightly), attach, append, affix, tag. 2. Nail (with tacks). 3. (Naut.) Put about, change the course of. II. v. n. (Naut.) Go about, tack ship. III …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 3 Tack (sailing) — Tack is a term used in sailing that has different meanings in different contexts. ailThe tack is the lower corner of the sail s leading edge. On a sloop rigged sailboat, the mainsail tack is connected to the mast and the boom at the gooseneck. On …

    Wikipedia

  • 4 Tack — Tack, n. [OE. tak, takke, a fastening; akin to D. tak a branch, twig, G. zacke a twig, prong, spike, Dan. takke a tack, spike; cf. also Sw. tagg prickle, point, Icel. t[=a]g a willow twig, Ir. taca a peg, nail, fastening, Gael. tacaid, Armor. &… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 Tack of a flag — Tack Tack, n. [OE. tak, takke, a fastening; akin to D. tak a branch, twig, G. zacke a twig, prong, spike, Dan. takke a tack, spike; cf. also Sw. tagg prickle, point, Icel. t[=a]g a willow twig, Ir. taca a peg, nail, fastening, Gael. tacaid, Armor …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6 Tack pins — Tack Tack, n. [OE. tak, takke, a fastening; akin to D. tak a branch, twig, G. zacke a twig, prong, spike, Dan. takke a tack, spike; cf. also Sw. tagg prickle, point, Icel. t[=a]g a willow twig, Ir. taca a peg, nail, fastening, Gael. tacaid, Armor …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7 Tack — Tack, v. i. (Naut.) To change the direction of a vessel by shifting the position of the helm and sails; also (as said of a vessel), to have her direction changed through the shifting of the helm and sails. See {Tack}, v. t., 4. [1913 Webster]… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8 tack — I. /tæk / (say tak) noun 1. a short, sharp pointed nail or pin, usually with a flat and comparatively large head. 2. a stitch, especially a long stitch used in fastening seams, etc., preparatory to a more thorough sewing. 3. a fastening,… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 9 tack — I. verb Etymology: Middle English takken, from tak Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. attach; especially to fasten or affix with tacks 2. to join in a slight or hasty manner 3. a. to add as a supplement …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 10 tack — tack1 [tæk] n ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(nail)¦ 2¦(pin)¦ 3¦(way of doing something)¦ 4¦(ship)¦ 5¦(horses)¦ 6¦(sewing)¦ 7¦(ugly objects)¦ ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ [Sense: 1 4, 6; Date: 1300 1400; : Old North French; Origin: taque fastening ] …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 11 tack — 1 noun 1 NAIL (C) a small nail with a sharp point and flat top 2 PIN (C) AmE a short pin with a large round flat top, for fixing notices to boards, walls etc; drawing pin BrE, thumbtack AmE 3 change tack/try a different tack etc to do something… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 12 tack — I n. short nail 1) a carpet; thumb (AE; BE has drawing pin) tack direction of a sailing ship 2) the port; starboard tack course of action direction 3) to change tack 4) (misc.) to go off on the wrong tack II v. (d; tr.) ( to attach ) to tack onto …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 13 tack — tack1 tacker, n. tackless, adj. /tak/, n. 1. a short, sharp pointed nail, usually with a flat, broad head. 2. Naut. a. a rope for extending the lower forward corner of a course. b. the lower forward corner of a course or fore and aft sail. See… …

    Universalium

  • 14 ship biscuit — Hardtack Hard tack or Hard tack Hard tack (h[aum]rd t[a^]k ), n. 1. A name given by soldiers and sailors to a kind of unleavened hard biscuit or sea bread. Called also {pilot biscuit}, {pilot bread}, {ship biscuit} and {ship bread} [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 15 ship bread — Hardtack Hard tack or Hard tack Hard tack (h[aum]rd t[a^]k ), n. 1. A name given by soldiers and sailors to a kind of unleavened hard biscuit or sea bread. Called also {pilot biscuit}, {pilot bread}, {ship biscuit} and {ship bread} [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 16 tack — English has three distinct words tack. The oldest, meaning ‘nail or other fastening’ [14], comes from Old Northern French taque, a variant of Old French tache ‘nail, fastening’. This was borrowed from prehistoric Germanic, but the nature of its… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 17 tack — English has three distinct words tack. The oldest, meaning ‘nail or other fastening’ [14], comes from Old Northern French taque, a variant of Old French tache ‘nail, fastening’. This was borrowed from prehistoric Germanic, but the nature of its… …

    Word origins

  • 18 Tack (square sail) — The tack of a square rigged sail is a line attached to its lower corner. This is in contrast to the more common fore and aft sail, whose tack is a part of the sail itself, the corner which is (possibly semi permanently) secured to the vessel.Most …

    Wikipedia

  • 19 tack — I [[t]tæk[/t]] n. 1) bui a short, sharp pointed nail, usu. with a broad, flat head 2) a course of action, esp. one differing from some preceding or other course: took the wrong tack[/ex] 3) a) naut. navig. the heading of a sailing vessel, when… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 20 tack — 1. n. & v. n. 1 a small sharp broad headed nail. 2 US a drawing pin. 3 a long stitch used in fastening fabrics etc. lightly or temporarily together. 4 a the direction in which a ship moves as determined by the position of its sails and regarded… …

    Useful english dictionary