swaggering

  • 1swaggering — index bluster (speech), inflated (vain), insolent Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 2Swaggering — Swagger Swag ger, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Swaggered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Swaggering}.] [Freq. of swag.] 1. To walk with a swaying motion; hence, to walk and act in a pompous, consequential manner. [1913 Webster] A man who swaggers about London clubs.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3swaggering — adjective 1. having or showing arrogant superiority to and disdain of those one views as unworthy (Freq. 2) some economists are disdainful of their colleagues in other social disciplines haughty aristocrats his lordly manners were offensive… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 4swaggering — swaggeringly, adv. /swag euhr ing/, adj. pertaining to, characteristic of, or behaving in the manner of a person who swaggers. [1590 1600; SWAGGER + ING2] * * * …

    Universalium

  • 5swaggering — Synonyms and related words: aweless, barefaced, blustering, blusterous, blustery, boisterous, bold, bold as brass, boldfaced, brassy, brazen, brazenfaced, bullying, hectoring, lost to shame, noisy, peacockish, peacocky, raging, ranting, raving,… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 6swaggering — swag·ger || swægÉ™(r) n. insolent manner, arrogant way of walking; proud and arrogant behavior v. strut, walk or move in an arrogant manner; behave in an arrogant and conceited manner, boast, brag …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 7swaggering — n. Bravado, bluster, gasconade, flourish, fanfaronade …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 8swaggering — swag•ger•ing [[t]ˈswæg ər ɪŋ[/t]] adj. characteristic of a person who swaggers; blustering • Etymology: 1590–1600 swag′ger•ing•ly, adv …

    From formal English to slang

  • 9σαυλοπρωκτιᾶν — σαυλοπρωκτιάω walk in a swaggering way pres part act masc voc sg (doric aeolic) σαυλοπρωκτιάω walk in a swaggering way pres part act neut nom/voc/acc sg (doric aeolic) σαυλοπρωκτιάω walk in a swaggering way pres part act masc nom sg (doric… …

    Greek morphological index (Ελληνική μορφολογικούς δείκτες)

  • 10Swash — Swash, n. 1. Impulse of water flowing with violence; a dashing or splashing of water. [1913 Webster] 2. A narrow sound or channel of water lying within a sand bank, or between a sand bank and the shore, or a bar over which the sea washes. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 11swagger — I. verb (swaggered; swaggering) Etymology: probably from 1swag + er (as in chatter) Date: circa 1596 intransitive verb 1. to conduct oneself in an arrogant or superciliously pompous manner; especially to walk with an air of overbearing self… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 12James Bond — Double Oh Seven redirects here. For other uses, see 007 (disambiguation). This article is about the spy series in general. For the character, see James Bond (character). For the film series, see James Bond in film. For the novels, see James Bond… …

    Wikipedia

  • 13Chronology of Shakespeare's plays — This article presents a possible chronological listing of the plays of William Shakespeare. Contents 1 Difficulty of creating a precise chronology 2 Chronology 3 Plays by Shakespeare …

    Wikipedia

  • 14Bully Dawson — was a renowned gambler from London, England in the time of Charles II. His name became a byword for a swaggering fool. His character is summed up by Charles Lamb: Bully Dawson kicked by half the town, and half the town kicked by Bully Dawson… …

    Wikipedia

  • 15Boasting — Boast redirects here. For the English curator, see Robin Boast. Bragger redirects here. For the English cricketer, see June Bragger. Ostentatious redirects here. For the Jewish Australian comedian, see Austen Tayshus. Swaggering redirects here.… …

    Wikipedia

  • 16Mitch Henderson — Sport(s) Basketball Current position Title Head coach Team Princeton Playing career 1994–1998 1998–1999 1999 Princeton Sligo Atlanta Hawks (DNP) …

    Wikipedia

  • 17Edward Corvan — Edward Ned Corvan (ca. 1830 – 1865) was a Tyneside concert hall song writer and performer, and a contemporary of George Geordie Ridley.[1] His songs were printed in a modified English orthography designed to represent the traditional dialect of… …

    Wikipedia

  • 18bravado — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) n. See boasting, insolence. II (Roget s IV) n. Syn. boasting, bluster, bold front, swagger, vaunting, bragging, gasconade, grandiosity, fanfaronade, bombast, rant, braggadocio, bullying, blowing, puffing …

    English dictionary for students

  • 19Insolence — (Roget s Thesaurus) >Undue assumption of superiority. < N PARAG:Insolence >N GRP: N 1 Sgm: N 1 insolence insolence Sgm: N 1 haughtiness haughtiness &c. >Adj. Sgm: N 1 arrogance arrogance airs Sgm: N 1 overbearance overbearance …

    English dictionary for students

  • 20swagger — [[t]swæ̱gə(r)[/t]] swaggers, swaggering, swaggered VERB If you swagger, you walk in a very proud, confident way, holding your body upright and swinging your hips. [V prep/adv] A broad shouldered man wearing a dinner jacket swaggered confidently… …

    English dictionary