swag

  • 1 swag — swag·er; swag·ger·er; swag·gie; swag·man; swag; swag·ger; horn·swag·gle; horn·swag·gled; swag·ger·ing·ly; …

    English syllables

  • 2 Swag — Swag, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Swagged}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Swagging}.] [Cf. Icel. sveggja, sveigja to bend, to sway, Norw. svaga to sway. See {Sway}.] 1. To hang or move, as something loose and heavy; to sway; to swing. [Prov. Eng.] [1913 Webster] 2.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 swag — [swag] vi. swagged, swagging [< or akin to Norw svagga, to sway (in walking), SWAGGER] 1. to sway or lurch 2. to hang down; sag vt. 1. to decorate with swags 2. to hang in a swag n …

    English World dictionary

  • 4 Swag — Swag, n. 1. A swaying, irregular motion. [1913 Webster] 2. A burglar s or thief s booty; boodle. [Cant or Slang] Charles Reade. [1913 Webster] 3. [Australia] (a) A tramping bushman s luggage, rolled up either in canvas or in a blanket so as to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 swag — (v.) to move heavily or unsteadily, 1520s, probably from O.N. sveggja to swing, sway, cognate with O.E. swingan to swing (see SWING (Cf. swing)). The noun sense of ornamental festoon is first found 1794. Colloquial sense of promotional material… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 6 swag — [swæg] n [Date: 1500 1600; Origin: swag to sway, hang down (16 19 centuries), probably from a Scandinavian language] 1.) [U] old fashioned informal goods that someone has stolen = ↑loot 2.) a) a large piece of material that is hung above a window …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 7 swag — index contraband, spoils Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 8 swag — [ swæg ] noun 1. ) uncount INFORMAL OLD FASHIONED stolen goods 2. ) count AUSTRALIAN a bag or a roll of cloth containing a traveler s personal possessions …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 9 swag — n *spoil, plunder, loot, booty, prize …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 10 swag — ► NOUN 1) an ornamental festoon of flowers, fruit, and greenery. 2) a curtain or drape fastened to hang in a drooping curve. 3) informal money or goods taken by a thief or burglar. 4) Austral./NZ a traveller s or miner s bundle of personal… …

    English terms dictionary

  • 11 swag — In British thieves slang swag was a thief s plunder or booty; a quantity of goods unlawfully acquired . The term appears in Grose s 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, where one of the definitions is any quantity of goods . James Hardy Vaux,… …

    Australian idioms

  • 12 Swag — In Australian historical terms, a swag is a portable shelter that is rolled (usually with belongings inside) and carried on a person s back. Historical UseBefore motor transport was common, foot travel over long distances was essential to workers …

    Wikipedia

  • 13 swag — swag1 /swag/, n., v., swagged, swagging. n. 1. a suspended wreath, garland, drapery, or the like, fastened up at or near each end and hanging down in the middle; festoon. 2. a wreath, spray, or cluster of foliage, flowers, or fruit. 3. a festoon …

    Universalium

  • 14 swag — I [[t]swæg[/t]] n. v. swagged, swag•ging 1) a suspended garland, drapery, etc., fastened at each end and hanging down in the middle; festoon 2) a wreath or cluster of foliage, flowers, or fruit 3) a swale 4) a swaying or lurching movement 5) to… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 15 swag — /swæg / (say swag) noun 1. a bundle or roll carried across the shoulders or otherwise, and containing the bedding and personal belongings of a traveller through the bush, a miner, etc.; shiralee; bluey; drum: *I got my rug and rolled it up into a …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 16 SWAG — 1) Something We All Get , borrowed from roadies, left over little goodies from shows, meetings, etc. Hey, can I have one of those hats? Sure it s SWAG. 2) Scientific Wild Ass Guess. No detailed analysis, but an educated guess. I ll make a swag at …

    Dictionary of american slang

  • 17 SWAG — 1) Something We All Get , borrowed from roadies, left over little goodies from shows, meetings, etc. Hey, can I have one of those hats? Sure it s SWAG. 2) Scientific Wild Ass Guess. No detailed analysis, but an educated guess. I ll make a swag at …

    Dictionary of american slang

  • 18 swag — [[t]swæ̱g[/t]] swags 1) N UNCOUNT Swag is stolen goods, or money obtained illegally. [INFORMAL, OLD FASHIONED] 2) N COUNT A swag is a piece of material that is put above a window and hangs down in a decorative way …

    English dictionary

  • 19 swag — UK [swæɡ] / US noun Word forms swag : singular swag plural swags 1) [countable] Australian a bag or a roll of cloth containing a traveller s personal possessions 2) [uncountable] informal old fashioned stolen goods …

    English dictionary

  • 20 swag — 1. noun a) A burglars or thiefs booty; a boodle. 1838, , , : b) a bushmans possessions tied up in a blanket and carried over the shoulder on a long stick. Its all arranged about bringing off the swag, is it? asked the Jew. Sikes nodded …

    Wiktionary