surliness

  • 1Surliness — Sur li*ness, n. The quality or state of being surly. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2surliness — surly ► ADJECTIVE (surlier, surliest) ▪ bad tempered and unfriendly. DERIVATIVES surlily adverb surliness noun. ORIGIN originally in the sense «lordly, haughty»: from obsolete sirly, from SIR(Cf. ↑sir) …

    English terms dictionary

  • 3surliness — noun see surly …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 4surliness — See surlily. * * * …

    Universalium

  • 5surliness — noun The property of being surly …

    Wiktionary

  • 6surliness — Synonyms and related words: abruptness, aggressiveness, bearishness, beastliness, bluntness, boorishness, bouderie, brashness, brusqueness, brusquerie, churlishness, crustiness, curtness, dejection, dumpishness, glumness, grimness, gruffness,… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 7surliness — sur·li·ness || sÉœrlɪnɪs / sɜː n. tendency towards ill humor, temper, irritability, sullenness …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 8surliness — sur·li·ness …

    English syllables

  • 9surliness — noun a disposition to exhibit uncontrolled anger his temper was well known to all his employees • Syn: ↑temper, ↑biliousness, ↑irritability, ↑peevishness, ↑pettishness, ↑snappishness • Derivationally rel …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 10biliousness — noun 1. gastric distress caused by a disorder of the liver or gall bladder • Derivationally related forms: ↑bilious • Hypernyms: ↑ill health, ↑unhealthiness, ↑health problem 2. a disposition to exhibit uncontrolled anger his temper was well known …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 11irritability — noun 1. an irritable petulant feeling (Freq. 1) • Syn: ↑crossness, ↑fretfulness, ↑fussiness, ↑peevishness, ↑petulance, ↑choler • Derivationally related forms: ↑ …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 12peevishness — noun 1. a disposition to exhibit uncontrolled anger his temper was well known to all his employees • Syn: ↑temper, ↑biliousness, ↑irritability, ↑pettishness, ↑snappishness, ↑surliness • De …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 13pettishness — noun a disposition to exhibit uncontrolled anger his temper was well known to all his employees • Syn: ↑temper, ↑biliousness, ↑irritability, ↑peevishness, ↑snappishness, ↑surliness • Derivationally related …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 14snappishness — noun a disposition to exhibit uncontrolled anger his temper was well known to all his employees • Syn: ↑temper, ↑biliousness, ↑irritability, ↑peevishness, ↑pettishness, ↑surliness • Derivationally related f …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 15Curstness — Curst ness (k[^u]rst n[e^]s), n. Peevishness; malignity; frowardness; crabbedness; surliness. [Obs.] Shak. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 16bearish — adjective Date: 1744 1. resembling a bear in build or in roughness, gruffness, or surliness < a bearish man > 2. a. marked by, tending to cause, or fearful of falling prices (as in a stock market) < bearish investors > b …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 17boorish — adjective Date: 1562 resembling or befitting a boor (as in crude insensitivity) • boorishly adverb • boorishness noun Synonyms: boorish, churlish, loutish, clownish mean uncouth in manners or appearance. boorish …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 18surly — adjective (surlier; est) Etymology: alteration of Middle English serreli lordly, imperious, probably from sire, ser sire Date: 1523 1. menacing or threatening in appearance < surly weather > 2. obsolete arrogant, imperious 3. irritably sullen and …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 19Elfstedentocht — The Elfstedentocht (English translation: Eleven cities Tour ) is a speed skating competition and leisure skating tour held irregularly in the province of Friesland, Netherlands. The tour, almost 200 km in length, is conducted on frozen canals,&#8230; …

    Wikipedia

  • 20Philia — ( el. φιλíα) in Aristotle s Nicomachean Ethics is usually translated as friendship , [And also sometimes as love .] though in fact his use of the term is rather broader than that. As Gerard Hughes points out, in Books VIII and IX Aristotle gives&#8230; …

    Wikipedia