supervise

  • 1supervise — su‧per‧vise [ˈsuːpəvaɪz ǁ pər ] verb [intransitive, transitive] to be in charge of a group of people or a particular area of work: • She supervises 26 workers in a business with annual sales of £4 million. • As managing director, he is… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 2Supervise — Su per*vise , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Supervised}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Supervising}.] [Pref. super + L. visere to look at attentively, to view, surely, intens. from videre, visum, to see. Cf. {Survise}, and {Survey}.] 1. To oversee for direction; to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3supervise — ► VERB ▪ observe and direct the performance of (a task or activity) or the work of (a person). DERIVATIVES supervision noun supervisor noun supervisory adjective. ORIGIN Latin supervidere survey, supervise …

    English terms dictionary

  • 4Supervise — Su per*vise , n. Supervision; inspection. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5supervise — I verb administer, care, caretake, check, command, conduct, control, direct, discipline, govern, guide, handle, have charge of, lead, look after, manage, moderate, officiate, operate, oversee, pilot, preside, preside over, regulate, rule, steer,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 6supervise — 1580s, to look over, from M.L. supervisus, pp. of supervidere oversee, inspect, from L. super over (see SUPER (Cf. super )) + videre see (see VISION (Cf. vision)). Meaning to oversee and superintend the work or performance of others is attested… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 7supervise — is spelt vise, not vize. See ize, ise …

    Modern English usage

  • 8supervise — [v] manage people, project administer, be in charge*, be in driver’s seat*, be in the saddle, be on duty, be responsible for, boss, call the play*, call the shots*, chaperon, conduct, control, crack the whip*, deal with, direct, handle, inspect,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 9supervise — [so͞o′pər vīz΄] vt., vi. supervised, supervising [< ML supervisus, pp. of supervidere < L super (see SUPER ) + videre, to see: see VISION] to oversee, direct, or manage (work, workers, a project, etc.); superintend supervision… …

    English World dictionary

  • 10supervise — verb ADVERB ▪ carefully, closely, directly, strictly, well ▪ The children will be closely supervised at all times. ▪ fully, properly …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 11supervise — [[t]su͟ːpə(r)vaɪz[/t]] supervises, supervising, supervised 1) VERB If you supervise an activity or a person, you make sure that the activity is done correctly or that the person is doing a task or behaving correctly. [V n] University teachers… …

    English dictionary

  • 12supervise */*/ — UK [ˈsuːpə(r)vaɪz] / US [ˈsupərˌvaɪz] verb [intransitive/transitive] Word forms supervise : present tense I/you/we/they supervise he/she/it supervises present participle supervising past tense supervised past participle supervised a) to be in… …

    English dictionary

  • 13supervise — 01. She [supervises] 5 women working in a daycare center. 02. A teacher is not required to [supervise] exams; one of the assistants can do that. 03. Olivia is an excellent employee who is able to work without [supervision]. 04. The United Nations …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 14supervise — verb 1) he had to supervise the loading Syn: oversee, superintend, be in charge of, preside over, direct, manage, run, look after, be responsible for, govern, organize, handle, micromanage 2) you may need to supervise the patient …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 15supervise — verb To direct, manage, or oversee; to be in charge Without someone to supervise, the group will lack direction. See Also: supervision, supervisor, supervisory …

    Wiktionary

  • 16supervise — su|per|vise [ supər,vaız ] verb intransitive or transitive ** to be in charge of a person or group of people and check that they are behaving or working correctly: Mary supervises two Ph.D. students. a. to be in charge of an activity or a place… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 17supervise — verb observe and direct the execution of (a task or activity) or the work of (a person). Derivatives supervision noun supervisor noun supervisory adjective Origin C15 (in the sense survey, peruse ): from med. L. supervis , supervidere survey,… …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 18supervise — [ˈsuːpəˌvaɪz] verb [I/T] 1) to be in charge of people and check that they are behaving or working correctly His job was to supervise the loading of the ship.[/ex] supervision [ˌsuːpəˈvɪʒ(ə)n] noun [U] 2) Here children can play safely under… …

    Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • 19supervise — transitive verb ( vised; vising) Etymology: Medieval Latin supervisus, past participle of supervidēre, from Latin super + vidēre to see more at wit Date: circa 1645 superintend, oversee …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 20supervise — /sooh peuhr vuyz /, v.t., supervised, supervising. to oversee (a process, work, workers, etc.) during execution or performance; superintend; have the oversight and direction of. [1580 90; < ML supervisus (ptp. of supervidere to oversee), equiv.&#8230; …

    Universalium