successive+increase+of+effect

  • 1 effect — The result or consequence of an action. [L. efficio, pp. effectus, to accomplish, fr. facio, to do] abscopal e. a reaction produced following irradiation but occurring outside the zone of actual radiation absorption. additive e. an e. wherein two …

    Medical dictionary

  • 2 Doppler effect — Change of wavelength caused by motion of the source. An animation illustrating how the Doppler effect causes a car engine or siren to soun …

    Wikipedia

  • 3 Flynn effect — The Flynn effect is the rise of average Intelligence Quotient (IQ) test scores over the generations, an effect seen in most parts of the world, although at greatly varying rates. It is named after James R. Flynn, who did much to document it and… …

    Wikipedia

  • 4 Ratchet effect — The ratchet effect is the commonly observed phenomenon that some processes cannot go backwards once certain things have happened, by analogy with the mechanical ratchet that holds the spring tight as a clock is wound up. It is related to the… …

    Wikipedia

  • 5 Races of the Mass Effect universe — This article is about the fictional races found within the Mass Effect universe. These races are explored in the novels Mass Effect: Revelation and Mass Effect: Ascension, and the video games Mass Effect, Mass Effect Galaxy, and Mass Effect 2.… …

    Wikipedia

  • 6 climax — n. 1. Gradual culmination, successive increase of effect. 2. Acme, culmination, top, summit …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 7 Glossary of rhetorical terms — Rhetorical Theory is a subject rife with jargon and special terminology. This page explains commonly used rhetorical terms in alphabetical order. The brief definitions here are intended to serve as a quick reference rather than an in depth… …

    Wikipedia

  • 8 Homeostasis — (from Greek: ὅμος, hómos , equal ; and ιστημι, istēmi , to stand lit. to stand equally ; coined by Walter Bradford Cannon) is the property of either an open system or a closed system, especially a living organism, that regulates its internal… …

    Wikipedia

  • 9 treppe — A phenomenon in cardiac muscle first observed by H.P. Bowditch; if a number of stimuli of the same intensity are sent into the muscle after a quiescent period, the first few contractions of the series show a successive …

    Medical dictionary

  • 10 United Kingdom — a kingdom in NW Europe, consisting of Great Britain and Northern Ireland: formerly comprising Great Britain and Ireland 1801 1922. 58,610,182; 94,242 sq. mi. (244,100 sq. km). Cap.: London. Abbr.: U.K. Official name, United Kingdom of Great… …

    Universalium

  • 11 Economic Affairs — ▪ 2006 Introduction In 2005 rising U.S. deficits, tight monetary policies, and higher oil prices triggered by hurricane damage in the Gulf of Mexico were moderating influences on the world economy and on U.S. stock markets, but some other… …

    Universalium

  • 12 Earth Sciences — ▪ 2009 Introduction Geology and Geochemistry       The theme of the 33rd International Geological Congress, which was held in Norway in August 2008, was “Earth System Science: Foundation for Sustainable Development.” It was attended by nearly… …

    Universalium

  • 13 ECONOMIC AFFAIRS — THE PRE MANDATE (LATE OTTOMAN) PERIOD Geography and Borders In September 1923 a new political entity was formally recognized by the international community. Palestine, or Ereẓ Israel as Jews have continued to refer to it for 2,000 years,… …

    Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • 14 education — /ej oo kay sheuhn/, n. 1. the act or process of imparting or acquiring general knowledge, developing the powers of reasoning and judgment, and generally of preparing oneself or others intellectually for mature life. 2. the act or process of… …

    Universalium

  • 15 Europe, history of — Introduction       history of European peoples and cultures from prehistoric times to the present. Europe is a more ambiguous term than most geographic expressions. Its etymology is doubtful, as is the physical extent of the area it designates.… …

    Universalium

  • 16 Russia — /rush euh/, n. 1. Also called Russian Empire. Russian, Rossiya. a former empire in E Europe and N and W Asia: overthrown by the Russian Revolution 1917. Cap.: St. Petersburg (1703 1917). 2. See Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. 3. See Russian… …

    Universalium

  • 17 France — /frans, frahns/; Fr. /frddahonns/, n. 1. Anatole /ann nann tawl /, (Jacques Anatole Thibault), 1844 1924, French novelist and essayist: Nobel prize 1921. 2. a republic in W Europe. 58,470,421; 212,736 sq. mi. (550,985 sq. km). Cap.: Paris. 3.… …

    Universalium

  • 18 United States — a republic in the N Western Hemisphere comprising 48 conterminous states, the District of Columbia, and Alaska in North America, and Hawaii in the N Pacific. 267,954,767; conterminous United States, 3,022,387 sq. mi. (7,827,982 sq. km); with… …

    Universalium

  • 19 china — /chuy neuh/, n. 1. a translucent ceramic material, biscuit fired at a high temperature, its glaze fired at a low temperature. 2. any porcelain ware. 3. plates, cups, saucers, etc., collectively. 4. figurines made of porcelain or ceramic material …

    Universalium

  • 20 China — /chuy neuh/, n. 1. People s Republic of, a country in E Asia. 1,221,591,778; 3,691,502 sq. mi. (9,560,990 sq. km). Cap.: Beijing. 2. Republic of. Also called Nationalist China. a republic consisting mainly of the island of Taiwan off the SE coast …

    Universalium