stutter

  • 1 stutter — (v.) 1560s, frequentative form of stutt, from M.E. stutten to stutter, stammer (late 14c.), cognate with M.L.G. stoten to knock, strike against, collide, from P.Gmc. *staut push, thrust (Cf. O.E. stotan, O.H.G. stozan, Goth. stautan to push,… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 2 stutter — ► VERB 1) talk with continued involuntary repetition of sounds, especially initial consonants. 2) (of a machine or gun) produce a series of short, sharp sounds. ► NOUN ▪ a tendency to stutter while speaking. DERIVATIVES stutterer noun. ORIGIN… …

    English terms dictionary

  • 3 stutter — [stut′ər] vt., vi. [freq. of dial. stut, to stutter < ME stutten, akin to Ger stossen, to knock, push < IE * (s)teud : see STUDY] 1. STAMMER 2. to make (a series of repeated sounds) [stuttering machine guns] n. the act or an instance of… …

    English World dictionary

  • 4 Stutter — Stut ter, n. 1. The act of stuttering; a stammer. See {Stammer}, and {Stuttering}. [1913 Webster] 2. One who stutters; a stammerer. [Obs.] Bacon. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 Stutter — Stut ter, v. t. & i. [imp. & p. p. {Stuttered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Stuttering}.] [Freq. of stut, OE. stoten; probably of Dutch or Low German origin; cf. D. & LG. stotteren, G. stottern, D. stooten to push, to strike; akin to G. stossen, Icel.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6 stutter — *stammer …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 7 stutter — [v] speak haltingly dribble, falter, hesitate, splutter, sputter, stammer, stumble; concept 77 Ant. continue …

    New thesaurus

  • 8 stutter — I UK [ˈstʌtə(r)] / US [ˈstʌtər] verb Word forms stutter : present tense I/you/we/they stutter he/she/it stutters present participle stuttering past tense stuttered past participle stuttered 1) [intransitive/transitive] to repeat the sounds of… …

    English dictionary

  • 9 stutter — stut|ter1 [ˈstʌtə US ər] v [Date: 1500 1600; Origin: stut to stutter (14 19 centuries)] 1.) [I and T] to speak with difficulty because you cannot stop yourself from repeating the first ↑consonant of some words →↑stammer ▪ I m D d david, he… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 10 stutter — stut|ter1 [ stʌtər ] verb 1. ) intransitive or transitive to repeat the sounds of words in an uncontrolled way when you speak because you are nervous or have a speech problem: Richard stuttered a reply and sat down, his face red. 2. )… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 11 stutter — I. verb Etymology: frequentative of English dialect stut to stutter, from Middle English stutten; akin to Dutch stotteren to stutter, Gothic stautan to strike more at contusion Date: 1566 intransitive verb 1. to speak with involuntary disruption… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 12 Stutter — Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom. Stutter peut faire référence à : Stutter (chanson d Elastica), chanson et maxi 45 tours du groupe britannique Elastica, sorti en 1993. Stutter… …

    Wikipédia en Français

  • 13 stutter — {{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}} noun ADJECTIVE ▪ bad, severe ▪ slight ▪ occasional VERB + STUTTER ▪ have, speak with …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 14 stutter — [[t]stʌ̱tə(r)[/t]] stutters, stuttering, stuttered 1) N COUNT: usu sing If someone has a stutter, they find it difficult to say the first sound of a word, and so they often hesitate or repeat it two or three times. He spoke with a pronounced… …

    English dictionary

  • 15 stutter — To speak dysfluently; to enunciate certain words with difficulty and with frequent halting and repetition of the initial consonant of a word or syllable. [frequentative of stut, from Goth. stautan, to strike] * * * stut·ter stət ər vi to speak… …

    Medical dictionary

  • 16 stutter — 1 verb 1 (I, T) to speak with difficulty because you cannot stop yourself from repeating the first consonant of some words; stammer 1: “I m D d david,” he stuttered. 2 (I) if a machine stutters, it keeps making little exploding noises and does… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 17 stutter — stut•ter [[t]ˈstʌt ər[/t]] v. i. 1) to speak with the rhythm interrupted by repetitions, blocks or spasms, or prolongations of sounds or syllables 2) to proceed or operate with spasmodic interruptions or repetitions 3) to say with a stutter 4) an …

    From formal English to slang

  • 18 stutter — stutterer, n. stutteringly, adv. /stut euhr/, v.t., v.i. 1. to speak in such a way that the rhythm is interrupted by repetitions, blocks or spasms, or prolongations of sounds or syllables, sometimes accompanied by contortions of the face and body …

    Universalium

  • 19 Stutter — This interesting name is a medieval job description which derives from the Olde English Stott (Cattle) or horses. There are many variant spellings which derive from local dialects, these include Stather, Stother, Stutter and Stoter or Stothard,… …

    Surnames reference

  • 20 stutter — verb talk with continued involuntary repetition of sounds, especially initial consonants. ↘(of a machine or gun) produce a series of short, sharp sounds. noun a tendency to stutter while speaking. Derivatives stutterer noun stuttering adjective… …

    English new terms dictionary