several

  • 1 several — sev·er·al adj [Anglo French, from Medieval Latin separalis, from Latin separ separate] 1 a: of or relating separately to each individual involved; specif: enforceable separately against each party each promisor owed a several duty see also… …

    Law dictionary

  • 2 Several — Sev er*al, a. [OF., fr. LL. separalis, fr. L. separ separate, different. See {Sever}, {Separate}.] 1. Separate; distinct; particular; single. [1913 Webster] Each several ship a victory did gain. Dryden. [1913 Webster] Each might his several… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 Several — Sev er*al, n. 1. Each particular taken singly; an item; a detail; an individual. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] There was not time enough to hear . . . The severals. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. Persons oe objects, more than two, but not very many. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 several — is an adjective and pronoun. As an adjective, it is only used with plural countable nouns (several people but not several furniture) and is more positive in implication than a few. However, unlike a few, several cannot be qualified by an adverb… …

    Modern English usage

  • 5 several — [sev′ər əl, sev′rəl] adj. [ME < Anglo Fr < ML separalis < L separ, separate, back form. < separare: see SEPARATE] 1. existing apart; separate; distinct; individual 2. different; respective [parted and went their several ways] 3. more… …

    English World dictionary

  • 6 Several — Sev er*al, adv. By itself; severally. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Every kind of thing is laid up several in barns or storehoudses. Robynson (More s Utopia). [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7 several — early 15c., existing apart, from Anglo Fr. several, from M.Fr. seperalis separate, from L. separe (ablative of *separ distinct ), back formation from separare to separate (see SEPARATE (Cf. separate)). Meaning various, diverse, different is… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 8 several — 1 *distinct, separate, discrete Analogous words: individual, particular, *special, especial 2 *many, sundry, various, divers, numerous, multifarious Analogous words: *single, separate, particular: detached, disengaged (see …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 9 several — [adj] assorted, various a few, a lot, any, certain, considerable, definite, different, disparate, distinct, divers, diverse, handful, hardly any, indefinite, individual, infrequent, manifold, many, not many, numerous, only a few, particular,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 10 several — ► DETERMINER & PRONOUN ▪ more than two but not many. ► ADJECTIVE ▪ separate or respective. DERIVATIVES severally adverb. ORIGIN Old French, from Latin separ separate, different …

    English terms dictionary

  • 11 several — sev|er|al [ sev(ə)rəl ] function word, quantifier *** Several can be used in the following ways: as a determiner (followed by a plural noun): Several buildings were damaged by the explosion. as a pronoun: If you want to see Edward s paintings,… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 12 several */*/*/ — UK [ˈsev(ə)rəl] / US determiner, pronoun Summary: Several can be used in the following ways: as a determiner (followed by a plural noun): Several buildings were damaged by the explosion. as a pronoun: If you want to see Edward s paintings, there… …

    English dictionary

  • 13 several — 01. I saw [several] of my old friends at our high school reunion. 02. Our plane was [several] hours late due to bad weather. 03. He has written [several] short stories about his experiences as a circus performer. 04. You received [several] phone… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 14 several — sev|er|al1 W1S1 [ˈsevərəl] determiner, pron a number of people or things that is more than a few, but not a lot ▪ I visited him in Kansas several times. ▪ Several people have volunteered to go. several hundred/thousand etc ▪ The bill came to… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 15 several — [[t]se̱vrəl[/t]] ♦ DET: DET pl n Several is used to refer to an imprecise number of people or things that is not large but is greater than two. I had lived two doors away from this family for several years... Several blue plastic boxes under the… …

    English dictionary

  • 16 several — determiner, pronoun several of (several of them) USAGE NOTE: The use of the preposition of is necessary when a pronoun follows. When a noun follows, the use of of the limits the meaning we saw several students; we saw several of the students whom …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 17 several*/*/*/ — [ˈsev(ə)rəl] grammar word summary: Several can be: ■ a determiner: Several buildings were damaged by the explosion. ■ a pronoun: If you want to see Edward s paintings, there are several in the city art gallery. ♦ I ve introduced her to several of …

    Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • 18 several — I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French, from Medieval Latin separalis, from Latin separ separate, back formation from separare to separate Date: 15th century 1. a. separate or distinct from one another < federal union of the… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 19 several — More than two, often used to designate a number greater than one. First Nat. Trust & Savings Bank of San Diego v. Industrial Accident Commission, 213 Cal. 322, 2 P.2d 347, 351. Each particular, or a small number singly taken. Nashville, C. & St.… …

    Black's law dictionary

  • 20 several — 1 quantifier a number of people or things that is more than a few, but not a lot: I visited him in Kansas several times. | several million dollars | Several people have volunteered to go. (+ of): Several of us think it s a bad idea. 2 adjective… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English