servility

  • 1Servility — Ser*vil i*ty, n. [Cf. F. servilit[ e].] The quality or state of being servile; servileness. [1913 Webster] To be a queen in bondage is more vile Than is a slave in base servility. Shak. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2servility — index amenability, discipline (obedience), fealty, homage Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 3Servility — (Roget s Thesaurus) < N PARAG:Servility >N GRP: N 1 Sgm: N 1 servility servility Sgm: N 1 slavery slavery &c.(subjection) 749 Sgm: N 1 obsequiousness obsequiousness &c. >Adj. Sgm: N 1 subserviency subserviency Sgm: N 1 abasement …

    English dictionary for students

  • 4servility — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) Obsequiousness Nouns 1. servility, obsequiousness, subserviency; abasement (see humility); prostration, genuflection; fawning, ingratiation; tuft hunting, timeserving, flunkyism; sycophancy, flattery.… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 5servility — servile ► ADJECTIVE 1) excessively willing to serve or please others. 2) of or characteristic of a slave or slaves. DERIVATIVES servilely adverb servility noun. ORIGIN Latin servilis, from servus slave …

    English terms dictionary

  • 6servility — noun see servile …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 7servility — See servilely. * * * …

    Universalium

  • 8servility — noun the condition of being servile …

    Wiktionary

  • 9servility — Synonyms and related words: abjection, abjectness, absolutism, acquiescence, agreeability, agreeableness, allegiance, apple polishing, ass kissing, back seat, baseness, bend, bending the knee, biddability, bob, bond service, bondage, bow, bowing… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 10servility — ser·vil·i·ty || sÉœr vɪlÉ™tɪ /sɜː n. condition of being a slave; extreme submissiveness, subservience; quality of being servile …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 11servility — n. 1. Slavery, bondage, dependence. 2. Slavishness, baseness, meanness, abjectness, abjection, obsequiousness, fawning, sycophancy …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 12servility — n 1. slavishness, servileness, obsequiousness, obsequence, subservience, Obs. vernility; submis siveness, docility, unassertiveness, compliance, acquiescence, deference, obeisance, abjection, abjectness, self abasement; groveling, crawling,… …

    A Note on the Style of the synonym finder

  • 13servility — ser·vil·i·ty …

    English syllables

  • 14servility — See: servile …

    English dictionary

  • 15servility — noun abject or cringing submissiveness • Syn: ↑obsequiousness, ↑subservience • Derivationally related forms: ↑subservient (for: ↑subservience), ↑servile, ↑obsequious …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 16History of Physics —     History of Physics     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► History of Physics     The subject will be treated under the following heads: I. A Glance at Ancient Physics; II. Science and Early Christian Scholars; III. A Glance at Arabian Physics; IV.… …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 17humility — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) Lack of pride Nouns 1. humility, humbleness; meekness, lowliness, lowness; [self ] abasement; submission, resignation; modesty, blush, suffusion, confusion. 2. humiliation, degradation, mortification;… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 18Macau — Aomen redirects here. For the island in the Pacific Ocean, see Aomen (Bikini Atoll). For other uses, see Macau (disambiguation). Coordinates: 22°10′N 113°33′E / 22.167°N 113.55°E …

    Wikipedia

  • 19Uncle Tom — This article is about the racial term. For the novel by Harriet Beecher Stowe, see Uncle Tom s Cabin. For the P. G. Wodehouse character, see Tom Travers. A 1901 stage adaptation of Uncle Tom s Cabin containing mixed elements of Harriet Beecher… …

    Wikipedia

  • 20John Gay — (30 June,1685 4 December,1732) was an English poet and dramatist. He is best remembered for The Beggar s Opera (1728), set to music by Johann Christoph Pepusch. The characters, including Captain Macheath and Polly Peachum, became household names …

    Wikipedia