seize+suddenly

  • 1seize — W3 [si:z] v [T] [Date: 1200 1300; : Old French; Origin: saisir to take possession of , from Medieval Latin sacire] 1.) to take hold of something suddenly and violently = ↑grab ▪ Suddenly he seized my hand. seize sth from sb ▪ Maggie sei …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 2Seize — Seize, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Seized}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Seizing}.] [OE. seisen, saisen, OF. seisir, saisir, F. saisir, of Teutonic origin, and akin to E. set. The meaning is properly, to set, put, place, hence, to put in possession of. See {Set}, v …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3seize — [ siz ] verb transitive ** 1. ) to take something using official power and force: CONFISCATE: Customs officials have seized 100 pounds of cocaine. Action was taken to seize criminal assets valued at $200 million. a ) to take control of a place or …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 4seize — [sēz] vt. seized, seizing [ME saisen < OFr saisir < ML sacire, prob. < Frank * sakjan, to lay claim to one s rights < IE base * sāg > SAKE1] 1. a) Historical to put in legal possession of a feudal holding b) to put in legal… …

    English World dictionary

  • 5seize — ► VERB 1) take hold of suddenly and forcibly. 2) take forcible possession of. 3) (of the police or another authority) take possession of by warrant or legal right. 4) take (an opportunity) eagerly and decisively. 5) (seize on/upon) take eager… …

    English terms dictionary

  • 6seize on something — ˈseize on/upon sth derived to suddenly show a lot of interest in sth, especially because you can use it to your advantage Syn: pounce on/upon • The rumours were eagerly seized upon by the local press. • Peter seized on her last comment …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 7seize upon something — ˈseize on/upon sth derived to suddenly show a lot of interest in sth, especially because you can use it to your advantage Syn: pounce on/upon • The rumours were eagerly seized upon by the local press. • Peter seized on her last comment …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 8seize — verb 1 take hold of sb/sth suddenly and firmly ADVERB ▪ immediately, suddenly ▪ He was immediately seized and thrown into prison. PREPOSITION ▪ by ▪ She sei …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 9seize — seizable, adj. seizer; Law. seizor /see zeuhr, zawr/, n. /seez/, v., seized, seizing. v.t. 1. to take hold of suddenly or forcibly; grasp: to seize a weapon. 2. to grasp mentally; understand clearly and completely: to seize an idea …

    Universalium

  • 10seize — [c]/siz / (say seez) verb (seized, seizing) –verb (t) 1. to lay hold of suddenly or forcibly; grasp: to seize a weapon. 2. to grasp with the mind: to seize an idea. 3. to take possession of by force or at will: to seize enemy ships. 4. to take… …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 11seize */*/ — UK [siːz] / US [sɪz] verb [transitive] Word forms seize : present tense I/you/we/they seize he/she/it seizes present participle seizing past tense seized past participle seized 1) a) to suddenly and firmly hold someone by a part of their body or… …

    English dictionary

  • 12seize — [[t]siz[/t]] v. seized, seiz•ing 1) to take hold of suddenly or forcibly; grasp: to seize a weapon[/ex] 2) to grasp mentally; understand clearly and completely: to seize an idea[/ex] 3) to take possession or control of as if by suddenly laying… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 13seize — [siːz] verb [T] 1) to suddenly and firmly hold someone or something ‘Listen, he said, seizing my wrist.[/ex] Before he could run away, she seized him by the collar.[/ex] 2) to take something using official power or force Syn: confiscate Customs… …

    Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • 14seize — [[t]si͟ːz[/t]] ♦♦♦ seizes, seizing, seized 1) VERB If you seize something, you take hold of it quickly, firmly, and forcefully. [V n] Leigh, he said seizing my arm to hold me back. [V n] ...an otter seizing a fish. 2) VERB When a group of people… …

    English dictionary

  • 15seize — verb 1》 take hold of suddenly and forcibly.     ↘take forcible possession of.     ↘(of the police or another authority) take possession of by warrant or legal right. 2》 take (an opportunity) eagerly and decisively.     ↘(seize on/upon) take eager …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 16seize — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) v. t. grasp, clutch; capture, arrest, appropriate, confiscate; afflict; attach, distrain; comprehend, understand. See stealing, intelligence, acquisition. II (Roget s IV) v. 1. [To grasp] Syn. take, take …

    English dictionary for students

  • 17seize up — 1) PHRASAL VERB If a part of your body seizes up, it suddenly stops working, because you have strained it or because you are getting old. [V P] After two days exertions, it s the arms and hands that seize up, not the legs... [V P] We are all born …

    English dictionary

  • 18seize up — phrasal verb [intransitive] Word forms seize up : present tense I/you/we/they seize up he/she/it seizes up present participle seizing up past tense seized up past participle seized up to suddenly stop moving or working properly Her back seized up …

    English dictionary

  • 19suddenly — adv. Suddenly is used with these adjectives: ↑afraid, ↑alert, ↑alive, ↑angry, ↑aware, ↑fashionable, ↑frightened, ↑nervous, ↑sharp, ↑startled, ↑uncomfortable, ↑ …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 20seize — v. 1 tr. take hold of forcibly or suddenly. 2 tr. take possession of forcibly (seized the fortress; seized power). 3 tr. take possession of (contraband goods, documents, etc.) by warrant or legal right, confiscate, impound. 4 tr. affect suddenly… …

    Useful english dictionary