scoff+at

  • 1Scoff — Scoff, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Scoffed} (?; 115); p. pr. & vb. n. {Scoffing}.] [Cf. Dan. skuffe to deceive, delude, Icel. skopa to scoff, OD. schoppen. See {Scoff}, n.] To show insolent ridicule or mockery; to manifest contempt by derisive acts or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2scoff — scoff, jeer, gibe, fleer, gird, sneer, flout can all mean to show one s scorn or contempt in derision or mockery. Scoff stresses insolence, irreverence, lack of respect, or incredulity as the motives for one s derision or mockery {it is an easy… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 3Scoff — Scoff, v. t. To treat or address with derision; to assail scornfully; to mock at. [1913 Webster] To scoff religion is ridiculously proud and immodest. Glanvill. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4Scoff — (?; 115), n. [OE. scof; akin to OFries. schof, OHG. scoph, Icel. skaup, and perh. to E. shove.] 1. Derision; ridicule; mockery; derisive or mocking expression of scorn, contempt, or reproach. [1913 Webster] With scoffs, and scorns, and… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5Scoff — «Scoff» Canción de Nirvana LP Bleach Publicación 15 de junio de 1989 …

    Wikipedia Español

  • 6scoff — scoff·er; scoff; scoff·ing·ly; …

    English syllables

  • 7scoff — [skɔf US sko:f, ska:f] v [Date: 1300 1400; Origin: Probably from a Scandinavian language] 1.) [I and T] to laugh at a person or idea, and talk about them in a way that shows you think they are stupid = ↑make fun of scoff at ▪ David scoffed at her …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 8scoff — Ⅰ. scoff [1] ► VERB ▪ speak about something in a scornfully derisive way. ► NOUN ▪ an expression of scornful derision. DERIVATIVES scoffer noun. ORIGIN perhaps Scandinavian. Ⅱ …

    English terms dictionary

  • 9scoff — index derogate, disdain (noun), disdain (verb), disparage, flout, humiliate, jape, jeer, mock ( …

    Law dictionary

  • 10scoff at — index contemn, discommend, reject Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 11scoff — (v.) late 14c., earlier as a noun, contemptuous ridicule (c.1300), from a Scandinavian source, Cf. O.N. skaup, skop mockery, M.Dan. skof jest, mockery; perhaps from P.Gmc. *skub , *skuf (Cf. O.E. scop poet, O.H.G. scoph fiction, sport, jest,… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 12scoff — [v] make fun of; despise belittle, boo*, contemn, deride, dig at*, disbelieve, discount, discredit, disdain, flout, gibe, jeer, knock*, laugh at, make light of*, mock, pan*, poke fun at, pooh pooh*, rag*, rally, reject, revile, ride, ridicule,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 13scoff — scoff1 [skäf, skôf] n. [ME scof, prob. < Scand: akin to OE scop, singer, OHG skof, poem, ridicule: for IE base see SHOVE] 1. an expression of mocking contempt, scorn, or derision; jeer 2. an object of mocking contempt, scorn, etc. vt. to mock… …

    English World dictionary

  • 14scoff´er — scoff1 «skf, skof», verb, noun. –v.i. to make fun to show one does not believe something; mock: »We scoffed at the idea of drowning in three inches of water. Fools, who came to scoff, remain d to pray(Oliver Goldsmith). –v.t. to jeer at; deride:… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 15scoff — I [[t]skɔf, skɒf[/t]] v. i. 1) to speak derisively; mock; jeer (often fol. by at) 2) to mock at; deride 3) an expression of mockery, derision, doubt, or derisive scorn 4) an object of mockery or derision • Etymology: 1300–50; ME (n., v.); cf.… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 16scoff — scoff1 [ skaf ] verb 1. ) intransitive to laugh or say things to show that you think someone or something is stupid or deserves no respect: It s easy to scoff when you haven t tried it yourself. scoff at: Economic analysts scoff at claims that… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 17scoff — UK [skɒf] / US [skɑf] verb Word forms scoff : present tense I/you/we/they scoff he/she/it scoffs present participle scoffing past tense scoffed past participle scoffed 1) [intransitive] to laugh or say things to show that you think someone or… …

    English dictionary

  • 18scoff — scoff1 scoffer, n. scoffingly, adv. /skawf, skof/, v.i. 1. to speak derisively; mock; jeer (often fol. by at): If you can t do any better, don t scoff. Their efforts toward a peaceful settlement are not to be scoffed at. v.t. 2. to mock at;… …

    Universalium

  • 19scoff — [[t]skɒ̱f[/t]] scoffs, scoffing, scoffed 1) VERB If you scoff at something, you speak about it in a way that shows you think it is ridiculous or inadequate. [V at n] At first I scoffed at the notion... You may scoff but I honestly feel I m being… …

    English dictionary

  • 20scoff — I. noun Etymology: Middle English scof, perhaps of Scandinavian origin; akin to obsolete Danish skof jest; akin to Old Frisian skof mockery Date: 14th century 1. an expression of scorn, derision, or contempt ; gibe 2. an object of scorn, mockery …

    New Collegiate Dictionary