school+of+the+Stoics

  • 1 The Porch — Porch Porch, n. [F. porche, L. porticus, fr. porta a gate, entrance, or passage. See {Port} a gate, and cf. {Portico}.] 1. (Arch.) A covered and inclosed entrance to a building, whether taken from the interior, and forming a sort of vestibule… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 Stoics and Stoic Philosophy — • The Stoic School was founded in 322 B.C. by Zeno of Cittium and existed until the closing of the Athenian schools (A.D. 429) Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Stoics and Stoic Philosophy     Stoics amd Stoic P …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 3 The Republic (Zeno) — The Republic of Zeno was a work written by Zeno of Citium, the founder of Stoic philosophy at the beginning of the 3rd century BC. Although it has not survived, it was his most famous work, and various quotes and paraphrases were preserved by… …

    Wikipedia

  • 4 The Highest Good —     The Highest Good     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► The Highest Good      We always act with a view to some good. The good is the object which all pursue, and for the sake of which they always act , says Plato (Republic, I, vi). His disciple… …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 5 The Stockyard Stoics — are a punk rock band based out of Brooklyn with current members all hailing from Eugene, Oregon. Their songs focus on political and social issues, in particular anarchism. The band is heavily influenced by such early British punk bands such as… …

    Wikipedia

  • 6 STOICS —    the disciples of Zeno; derived their name from the stoa or portico in Athens where their master taught and founded the school in 340 B.C. The doctrines of the school were completely antagonistic to those of Epicurus, and among the disciples of …

    The Nuttall Encyclopaedia

  • 7 School of Stoics — Stoic Sto ic, n. [L. stoicus, Gr. ?, fr. ?, adj., literally, of or pertaining to a colonnade, from ? a roofed colonnade, a porch, especially, a porch in Athens where Zeno and his successors taught.] 1. A disciple of the philosopher Zeno; one of a …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8 Stoics — Sto·ic || stəʊɪk n. member of the stoic school of philosophy (philosophy maintaining that a wise man should be free from passion) …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 9 Peripatetic school (The) — The Peripatetic school1 Robert W.Sharples THE HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL AND OF ARISTOTLE’S WRITINGS The history of Peripatetic philosophy after Aristotle falls into two phases, divided by the renewal of interest in the works we now possess after… …

    History of philosophy

  • 10 Sceptics (The) — The sceptics Michael Frede INTRODUCTION When we speak of ‘scepticism’ and of ‘sceptics’, we primarily think of a philosophical position according to which nothing is known for certain, or even nothing can be known for certain. There are certain… …

    History of philosophy

  • 11 Megarian school of philosophy — The Megarian school of philosophy was founded by Euclides of Megara, one of the pupils of Socrates.Two main elements went to make up the Megarian as a doctrine. Like the Cynics and the Cyrenaics, Euclides started from the Socratic principle that… …

    Wikipedia

  • 12 Spinoza: the moral and political philosophy — The moral and political philosophy of Spinoza Hans W.Blom Spinoza as a moral and political philosopher was the proponent of a radical and extremely consistent version of seventeenth century Dutch naturalism. As a consequence of the burgeoning… …

    History of philosophy

  • 13 Stowe School — Not to be confused with Stow College. Stowe School Motto Latin: Persto et Praesto ( I stand firm and I stand first ) Established 1923 …

    Wikipedia

  • 14 Megarian school — Megara in Attica, lying equidistant from Athens, Thebes, and Corinth The Megarian school of philosophy (also called the Dialectical school), which flourished in the 4th century BC, was founded by Euclid of Megara, one of the pupils of Socrates.… …

    Wikipedia

  • 15 Celsus the Platonist — • An eclectic Platonist and polemical writer against Christianity, who flourished towards the end of the second century Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Celsus the Platonist     Celsus the Platonist …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 16 Boethius: from antiquity to the Middle Ages — John Marenbon Boethius is a difficult figure to place in the history of philosophy. Considered just in himself, he clearly belongs to the world of late antiquity. Born in 480, at a time when Italy was ruled by the Ostrogoths under their king,… …

    History of philosophy

  • 17 Philosophy of the Academy — Philosophy Phi*los o*phy (f[i^]*l[o^]s [ o]*f[y^]), n.; pl. {Philosophies} (f[i^]*l[o^]s [ o]*f[i^]z). [OE. philosophie, F. philosophie, L. philosophia, from Gr. filosofi a. See {Philosopher}.] 1. Literally, the love of, inducing the search after …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 18 Philosophy of the Garden — Philosophy Phi*los o*phy (f[i^]*l[o^]s [ o]*f[y^]), n.; pl. {Philosophies} (f[i^]*l[o^]s [ o]*f[i^]z). [OE. philosophie, F. philosophie, L. philosophia, from Gr. filosofi a. See {Philosopher}.] 1. Literally, the love of, inducing the search after …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 19 Philosophy of the Lyceum — Philosophy Phi*los o*phy (f[i^]*l[o^]s [ o]*f[y^]), n.; pl. {Philosophies} (f[i^]*l[o^]s [ o]*f[i^]z). [OE. philosophie, F. philosophie, L. philosophia, from Gr. filosofi a. See {Philosopher}.] 1. Literally, the love of, inducing the search after …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 20 Philosophy of the Porch — Philosophy Phi*los o*phy (f[i^]*l[o^]s [ o]*f[y^]), n.; pl. {Philosophies} (f[i^]*l[o^]s [ o]*f[i^]z). [OE. philosophie, F. philosophie, L. philosophia, from Gr. filosofi a. See {Philosopher}.] 1. Literally, the love of, inducing the search after …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English