roisterer

  • 1Roisterer — Roist er*er, n. A blustering, turbulent fellow. [1913 Webster] If two roisterers met, they cocked their hats in each other faces. Macaulay. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2roisterer — index hoodlum Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 3roisterer — roister ► VERB ▪ enjoy oneself or celebrate in a noisy or boisterous way. DERIVATIVES roisterer noun roisterous adjective. ORIGIN from obsolete roister «roisterer», from French rustre ruffian …

    English terms dictionary

  • 4roisterer — noun see roister II …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 5roisterer — See roister. * * * …

    Universalium

  • 6roisterer — noun One who roisters; a reveller …

    Wiktionary

  • 7roisterer — roist·er·er || rɔɪstÉ™rÉ™(r) n. one who celebrates without restraint, one who revels in a loud and riotous manner …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 8roisterer — n. Swaggerer, bully, rioter, blustering fellow …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 9roisterer — rois·ter·er …

    English syllables

  • 10roisterer — noun an especially noisy and unrestrained merrymaker • Derivationally related forms: ↑roister • Hypernyms: ↑reveler, ↑reveller, ↑merrymaker …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 11roister — roisterer, n. roisterous, adj. roisterously, adv. /roy steuhr/, v.i. 1. to act in a swaggering, boisterous, or uproarious manner. 2. to revel noisily or without restraint. [1545 55; v. use of roister (n.) < MF ru(i)stre ruffian, boor, var. of&#8230; …

    Universalium

  • 12roister — I. noun Etymology: Middle French rustre lout, alteration of ruste, from ruste, adjective, rude, rough, from Latin rusticus rural more at rustic Date: 1551 archaic one that roisters ; roisterer II. intransitive verb (roistered; roistering …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 13Fink, Mike — born 1770/80, Fort Pitt, Pa. died 1823, Fort Henry? [North Dakota] U.S. keelboatman. He won fame in his youth as a local marksman and Indian scout. Later, when keelboats became the chief vessels of commerce on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, he&#8230; …

    Universalium

  • 14roister — [ rɔɪstə] verb enjoy oneself or celebrate in a noisy or boisterous way. Derivatives roisterer noun roisterous adjective Origin C16: from obs. roister roisterer , from Fr. rustre ruffian …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 15roister — ► VERB ▪ enjoy oneself or celebrate in a noisy or boisterous way. DERIVATIVES roisterer noun roisterous adjective. ORIGIN from obsolete roister «roisterer», from French rustre ruffian …

    English terms dictionary

  • 16roisterous — roister ► VERB ▪ enjoy oneself or celebrate in a noisy or boisterous way. DERIVATIVES roisterer noun roisterous adjective. ORIGIN from obsolete roister «roisterer», from French rustre ruffian …

    English terms dictionary

  • 17roister — v.intr. (esp. as roistering adj.) revel noisily; be uproarious. Derivatives: roisterer n. roistering n. roisterous adj. Etymology: obs. roister roisterer f. F rustre ruffian var. of ruste f. L rusticus RUSTIC …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 18Ephesian — E*phe sian, n. 1. A native of Ephesus. [1913 Webster] 2. A jolly companion; a roisterer. [Obs.] Shak. [1913 Webster] || …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 19Rioter — Ri ot*er, n. 1. One who riots; a reveler; a roisterer. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] 2. (Law) One who engages in a riot. See {Riot}, n., 3. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 20Roister — Roist er, n. See {Roisterer}. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English