rhetoric

  • 1Rhetoric — Rhet o*ric, n. [F. rh[ e]torique, L. rhetorica, Gr. ???? (sc. ???), fr. ??? rhetorical, oratorical, fr. ??? orator, rhetorician; perhaps akin to E. word; cf. ??? to say.] 1. The art of composition; especially, elegant composition in prose. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2rhetoric — ► NOUN 1) the art of effective or persuasive speaking or writing. 2) language with a persuasive or impressive effect, but often lacking sincerity or meaningful content. ORIGIN from Greek rh torik tekhn art of rhetoric …

    English terms dictionary

  • 3rhetoric — I (insincere language) noun affectation, artificial eloquence, bombastic speech, declamation, euphuism, grandiloquence, grandiosity, inflated language, loftiness, magniloquence, pomposity, pompous speech, pompousness, pretension, pretentiousness… …

    Law dictionary

  • 4rhetoric — (n.) c.1300, from O.Fr. rethorique, from L. rhetorice, from Gk. rhetorike techne art of an orator, from rhetor (gen. rhetoros) orator, related to rhema word, lit. that which is spoken, from PIE *wre tor , from root *were to speak (Cf. O.E …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 5rhetoric — [n] wordiness; long speech address, balderdash*, big talk*, bombast, composition, discourse, elocution, eloquence, flowery language, fustian, grandiloquence, hot air*, hyperbole, magniloquence, oration, oratory, pomposity, rant, verbosity;… …

    New thesaurus

  • 6rhetoric — [ret′ər ik] n. [ME rethorike < OFr or L: OFr rethorique < L rhetorica < Gr rhētorikē (technē), rhetorical (art) < rhētōr, orator: see RHETOR] 1. a) the art of using words effectively in speaking or writing; esp., now, the art of prose …

    English World dictionary

  • 7Rhetoric — This article is about the art of rhetoric in general. For the work by Aristotle, see Rhetoric (Aristotle). Painting depicting a lecture in a knight academy, painted by Pieter Isaacsz or Reinhold Timm for Rosenborg Castle as part of a series of… …

    Wikipedia

  • 8rhetoric — /ret euhr ik/, n. 1. (in writing or speech) the undue use of exaggeration or display; bombast. 2. the art or science of all specialized literary uses of language in prose or verse, including the figures of speech. 3. the study of the effective… …

    Universalium

  • 9rhetoric — noun 1) a form of rhetoric Syn: oratory, eloquence, command of language, way with words 2) empty rhetoric Syn: bombast, turgidity, grandiloquence, magniloquence, pomposity, extravagant language, purple prose; …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 10rhetoric — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ empty, mere ▪ Her speech was just empty rhetoric. ▪ fiery, inflammatory, powerful, radical ▪ …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 11rhetoric — rhet|o|ric [ retərık ] noun uncount * a style of speaking or writing that is intended to influence people: angry nationalist rhetoric anti American rhetoric the rhetoric of freedom/reform/law and order a. a style of speaking or writing that is… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 12rhetoric — [[t]re̱tərɪk[/t]] 1) N UNCOUNT (disapproval) If you refer to speech or writing as rhetoric, you disapprove of it because it is intended to convince and impress people but may not be sincere or honest. The change is largely cosmetic, a matter of… …

    English dictionary

  • 13rhetoric */ — UK [ˈretərɪk] / US noun [uncountable] a style of speaking or writing that is intended to influence people angry nationalist rhetoric anti American rhetoric the rhetoric of freedom/reform/law and order a) a style of speaking or writing that is… …

    English dictionary

  • 14rhetoric — n. 1) to resort to, spout rhetoric 2) eloquent; impassioned, passionate; soothing rhetoric * * * [ retərɪk] impassioned passionate soothing rhetoric spout rhetoric eloquent to resort to …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 15rhetoric — rhet|o|ric [ˈretərık] n [U] [Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: rethorique, from Latin, from Greek rhetorike, from rhetor public speaker , from eirein to say, speak ] 1.) language that is used to persuade or influence people, especially… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 16rhetoric — The art of using language so as to persuade or influence others. Although rhetoric is apparently opposed to the philosophical ideal of the exact pursuit of truth, their reconciliation has sometimes seemed desirable, most notably to Cicero . If… …

    Philosophy dictionary

  • 17rhetoric — noun (U) 1 language used to persuade or influence people, especially by politicians: the rhetoric of their political rallies 2 speech or writing that sounds impressive, but is not actually sincere or very useful: Positive action is better than… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 18rhetoric — noun 1) a form of rhetoric Syn: oratory, eloquence, command of language, way with words 2) empty rhetoric Syn: wordiness, verbosity, grandiloquence, bombast, pomposity, extravagant language …

    Synonyms and antonyms dictionary

  • 19rhetoric — noun /ˈɹɛtəɹɪk/ a) The art of using language, especially public speaking, as a means to persuade. It’s only so much rhetoric. b) Meaningless language with an exaggerated style intended to impress …

    Wiktionary

  • 20rhetoric — Synonyms and related words: Barnumism, affectation, articulateness, bedizenment, big talk, bluster, bombast, choice of words, command of language, command of words, composition, convolution, debating, declamation, demagogism, dialect, diction,… …

    Moby Thesaurus