reprobate

  • 1 Reprobate — Rep ro*bate ( b?t), a. [L. reprobatus, p. p. of reprobare to disapprove, condemn. See {Reprieve}, {Reprove}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Not enduring proof or trial; not of standard purity or fineness; disallowed; rejected. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Reprobate …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 reprobate# — reprobate vb censure, reprehend, *criticize, blame, condemn, denounce Analogous words: *decry, derogate, detract, depreciate, disparage: reject, repudiate, spurn (see DECLINE vb): reprimand, rebuke, *reprove reprobate adj *a …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 3 Reprobate — Rep ro*bate, n. One morally abandoned and lost. [1913 Webster] I acknowledge myself for a reprobate, a villain, a traitor to the king. Sir W. Raleigh. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 reprobate — I adjective accusable, bad, base, blameworthy, corrupt, criminal, culpable, degenerate, depraved, disgusting, disreputable, dissolute, evil minded, facinorous, felonious, flagitious, flagrant, hardened, heinous, immoral, incorrigible, infamous,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 5 Reprobate — Rep ro*bate ( b?t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Reprobated} ( b? t?d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Reprobating}.] 1. To disapprove with detestation or marks of extreme dislike; to condemn as unworthy; to disallow; to reject. [1913 Webster] Such an answer as this… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6 reprobate — ‘Reprobate silver’ (AV, Jer. 6:30) means silver rejected when tested, and is applied metaphorically to the wicked. Paul uses the same adjective to describe the unrighteous (AV, Rom. 1:28) which NRSV translates ‘debased’, REB ‘depraved’, NJB… …

    Dictionary of the Bible

  • 7 reprobate — (adj.) 1540s, rejected as worthless, from L.L. reprobatus, pp. of reprobare disapprove, reject, condemn, from L. re opposite of, reversal of previous condition + probare prove to be worthy (see PROBATE (Cf. probate)). The noun is recorded from… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 8 reprobate — [adj] shameless bad, corrupt, degenerate, foul, immoral, improper, incorrigible, lewd, rude, sinful, unprincipled, vile, wanton, wicked; concepts 401,545 …

    New thesaurus

  • 9 reprobate — ► NOUN ▪ a person without moral principles. ► ADJECTIVE ▪ unprincipled. DERIVATIVES reprobation noun. ORIGIN from Latin reprobare disapprove …

    English terms dictionary

  • 10 reprobate — [rep′rə bāt΄; ] for adj. & n., often [, rep′rəbit] vt. reprobated, reprobating [ME reprobaten < LL(Ec) reprobatus, pp. of reprobare: see REPROVE] 1. to disapprove of strongly; condemn 2. to reject 3. Theol. to damn adj …

    English World dictionary

  • 11 reprobate — I. transitive verb ( bated; bating) Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin reprobatus, past participle of reprobare more at reprove Date: 15th century 1. to condemn strongly as unworthy, unacceptable, or evil < reprobating the laxity of the… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 12 reprobate — 1. adjective /ˈɹɛpɹəbət/ a) Rejected; cast off as worthless. Strength and Art are easily out done / By Spirits reprobate b) Rejected by God; damned, sinful. The reprobate criminal sneered at me. 2. noun /ˈɹɛp …

    Wiktionary

  • 13 reprobate — [[t]re̱prəbeɪt[/t]] reprobates N COUNT (disapproval) If you describe someone as a reprobate, you mean that they behave in a way that is not respectable or morally correct. [OLD FASHIONED] Far from being the drunken reprobate of popular legend,… …

    English dictionary

  • 14 reprobate — UK [ˈreprəʊbeɪt] / US [ˈreproʊˌbeɪt] noun [countable] Word forms reprobate : singular reprobate plural reprobates often humorous someone who behaves in a way that you do not approve of …

    English dictionary

  • 15 reprobate — reprobacy /rep reuh beuh see/, reprobateness, n. reprobater, n. /rep reuh bayt /, n., adj., v., reprobated, reprobating. n. 1. a depraved, unprincipled, or wicked person: a drunken reprobate. 2. a person rejected by God and beyond hope of… …

    Universalium

  • 16 reprobate — rep|ro|bate [ˈreprəbeıt] n [Date: 1500 1600; : Late Latin; Origin: , past participle of reprobare; REPROVE] formal someone who behaves in an immoral way often used humorously >reprobate adj …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 17 reprobate — noun (C) formal or humorous someone who behaves in an immoral way: an old reprobate who spent all his money on gin …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 18 reprobate — /ˈrɛprəbeɪt / (say repruhbayt) noun 1. an abandoned, unprincipled, or reprehensible person: *It might stop the old reprobate from sneaking down to bandicoot some of ours? –barney roberts, 1987. 2. Obsolete (in Calvinism) a person rejected by God… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 19 Reprobate —    That which is rejected on account of its own worthlessness (Jer. 6:30; Heb. 6:8; Gr. adokimos, rejected ). This word is also used with reference to persons cast away or rejected because they have failed to make use of opportunities offered… …

    Easton's Bible Dictionary

  • 20 reprobate — Synonyms and related words: abandoned, abominable, accursed, accuse, amoral, anathematize, anathemize, animadvert on, arraign, arrant, atrocious, backslider, bad, bad egg, bad lot, base, bastard, black, black sheep, blackguard, blackguardly,… …

    Moby Thesaurus