recant

  • 1 recant — re·cant /ri kant/ vt: to renounce or withdraw (prior statements or testimony) surprised the prosecution by recant ing statements made earlier to the police vi: to renounce or withdraw prior statements or testimony re·can·ta·tion /ˌrē ˌkan tā… …

    Law dictionary

  • 2 Recant — Re*cant (r[ e]*k[a^]nt ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Recanted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Recanting}.] [L. recantare, recantatum, to recall, recant; pref. re re + cantare to sing, to sound. See 3d {Cant}, {Chant}.] To withdraw or repudiate formally and publicly …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 Recant — Re*cant , v. i. To revoke a declaration or proposition; to unsay what has been said; to retract; as, convince me that I am wrong, and I will recant. Dryden. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 recant — (v.) 1530s, from L. recantare recall, revoke, from re back (see RE (Cf. re )) + cantare to chant (see CANT (Cf. cant) (1)). A word from the Reformation. Loan translation of Gk. palinoidein recant, from palin back + …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 5 recant — retract, *abjure, renounce, forswear Analogous words: withdraw, remove …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 6 recant — [v] take back something said abjure, abnegate, abrogate, annul, apostatize, back down, back off, back out, backtrack*, call back, cancel, contradict, countermand, deny, dial back*, disavow, disclaim, disown, eat one’s words*, forswear, go back on …

    New thesaurus

  • 7 recant — ► VERB ▪ renounce a former opinion or belief. DERIVATIVES recantation noun. ORIGIN Latin recantare revoke , from cantare sing, chant …

    English terms dictionary

  • 8 recant — [ri kant′] vt., vi. [L recantare < re , back, again + cantare, freq. of canere, to sing: see CHANT] to withdraw or renounce (beliefs or statements formerly held), esp. in a formal or public manner recantation [rē΄kan tā′shən] n. recanter n …

    English World dictionary

  • 9 recant — verb 1) he was forced to recant his political beliefs Syn: renounce, disavow, deny, repudiate, renege on; formal forswear, abjure 2) he refused to recant Syn: change one s mind, be apostate; rare tergiversate 3) …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 10 recant — [[t]rɪkæ̱nt[/t]] recants, recanting, recanted VERB If you recant, you say publicly that you no longer hold a set of beliefs that you had in the past. [FORMAL] Alarmed by the furor the letter created, White House officials ordered Williams to… …

    English dictionary

  • 11 recant — UK [rɪˈkænt] / US verb [intransitive/transitive] Word forms recant : present tense I/you/we/they recant he/she/it recants present participle recanting past tense recanted past participle recanted formal 1) to say that something you said was not… …

    English dictionary

  • 12 recant — verb /rəˈkænt/ To withdraw from or repudiate a statement or opinion formerly expressed, especially formally and publicly. Convince me that I am wrong, and I will recant. Syn: disavow, retract, take back, unsay See Also …

    Wiktionary

  • 13 recant — verb (I, T) formal to say publicly that you no longer have a political or religious belief that you had before: Galileo was forced to recant his belief in the Copernican theory. recantation noun (C, U) …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 14 recant — verb Etymology: Latin recantare, from re + cantare to sing more at chant Date: 1535 transitive verb 1. to withdraw or repudiate (a statement or belief) formally and publicly ; renounce 2. revoke intransitive verb to make an open confession of… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 15 recant — recantation /ree kan tay sheuhn/, n. recanter, n. recantingly, adv. /ri kant /, v.t. 1. to withdraw or disavow (a statement, opinion, etc.), esp. formally; retract. v.i. 2. to withdraw or disavow a statement, opinion, etc., esp. formally. [1525… …

    Universalium

  • 16 recant — Synonyms and related words: abandon, abjure, abolish, abrogate, annul, assert the contrary, back down, back out, backwater, belie, brush aside, cancel, cede, chuck, chuck out, climb down, contemn, contest, contradict, contravene, controvert,… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 17 recant — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) v. t. withdraw, take back, renounce, retract, disavow, repudiate. See penitence, nullification II (Roget s IV) v. Syn. retract, revoke, renounce, disavow, disclaim, abjure, deny, take back, cancel, back… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 18 recant — re|cant [rıˈkænt] v [I and T] [Date: 1500 1600; : Latin; Origin: recantare, from cantare to sing ] formal to say publicly that you no longer have a political or religious belief that you had before >recantation [ˌri:kænˈteıʃən] n [U and C] …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 19 recant — re|cant [ rı kænt ] verb intransitive or transitive FORMAL 1. ) to say that something you said was not true: He later recanted his confession. 2. ) to state publicly that you no longer believe something, especially that you no longer have a… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 20 recant — re·cant || rɪ kænt v. give up, renounce; deny, disavow, retract …

    English contemporary dictionary