ready+utterance

  • 1George Gledstanes — or Gladstanes (c. 1562 1615 [Alan R. MacDonald, [http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/10784 ‘Gledstanes , George (c.1562–1615)’] , Oxford Dictionary of National Biography , Oxford University Press, 2004] ) was an Archbishop of St Andrews during… …

    Wikipedia

  • 2Aaron —    The eldest son of Amram and Jochebed, a daughter of Levi (Ex. 6:20). Some explain the name as meaning mountaineer, others mountain of strength, illuminator. He was born in Egypt three years before his brother Moses, and a number of years after …

    Easton's Bible Dictionary

  • 3flippant — a. 1. Voluble, fluent, glib, talkative, nimble of speech, of ready utterance. 2. Pert, impertinent, malapert, forward, bold, inconsiderately glib, unscrupulously pert …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 4fluency — n. 1. Smoothness, flowing quality, liquidness. 2. Copiousness, affluence, readiness of speech, ready utterance, command of language, facility of expression, gift of the gab (colloq.) …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 5Speech act — For the US Act, see SPEECH Act of 2010. Speech Act is a technical term in linguistics and the philosophy of language. The contemporary use of the term goes back to John L. Austin s doctrine of locutionary, illocutionary, and perlocutionary acts.… …

    Wikipedia

  • 6History of American newspapers — The history of American newspapers goes back to the 17th century with the publication of the first colonial newspapers.Colonial period(This section is based on [http://www.bartleby.com/225/index.html#7 The Cambridge History of English and… …

    Wikipedia

  • 7Roman Catholicism — the faith, practice, and system of government of the Roman Catholic Church. [1815 25] * * * Largest single Christian denomination in the world, with some one billion members, or about 18% of the world s population. The Roman Catholic church has… …

    Universalium

  • 8shout — vb Shout, yell, shriek, scream, screech, squeal, holler, whoop are comparable when they mean as verbs to make or utter a loud and penetrating sound that tends or is intended to attract attention and, as nouns, a sound or utterance of this… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 9Luther, Martin — • Leader of the great religious revolt of the sixteenth century in Germany; born at Eisleben, 10 November, 1483; died at Eisleben, 18 February, 1546 Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Luther, Martin      …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 10Luther —     Martin Luther     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► Martin Luther     Leader of the great religious revolt of the sixteenth century in Germany; born at Eisleben, 10 November, 1483; died at Eisleben, 18 February, 1546.     His father, Hans, was a… …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 11Martin Luther —     Martin Luther     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► Martin Luther     Leader of the great religious revolt of the sixteenth century in Germany; born at Eisleben, 10 November, 1483; died at Eisleben, 18 February, 1546.     His father, Hans, was a… …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 12Margaret McDonald (visionary) — Margaret MacDonald was born in 1815 in Port Glasgow, Scotland and died around 1840.[1] She lived with her two older brothers, James and George, both of whom ran a shipping business.[1] Beginning in 1826 and through 1829, a few preachers in… …

    Wikipedia

  • 13France — /frans, frahns/; Fr. /frddahonns/, n. 1. Anatole /ann nann tawl /, (Jacques Anatole Thibault), 1844 1924, French novelist and essayist: Nobel prize 1921. 2. a republic in W Europe. 58,470,421; 212,736 sq. mi. (550,985 sq. km). Cap.: Paris. 3.… …

    Universalium

  • 14Logicism — is one of the schools of thought in the philosophy of mathematics, putting forth the theory that mathematics is an extension of logic and therefore some or all mathematics is reducible to logic.[1] Bertrand Russell and Alfred North Whitehead… …

    Wikipedia

  • 15Deconstruction and Derrida — Simon Critchley and Timothy Mooney DERRIDIAN DECONSTRUCTION1 In the last twenty five years or so, particularly in the English speaking world, no philosopher has attracted more notoriety, controversy and misunderstanding than Jacques Derrida.… …

    History of philosophy

  • 16Europe, history of — Introduction       history of European peoples and cultures from prehistoric times to the present. Europe is a more ambiguous term than most geographic expressions. Its etymology is doubtful, as is the physical extent of the area it designates.… …

    Universalium

  • 17Untranslatability — is a property of a text, or of any utterance, in one language, for which no equivalent text or utterance can be found in another language.Terms are neither exclusively translatable nor exclusively untranslatable; rather, the degree of difficulty… …

    Wikipedia

  • 18Rough for Radio II — is a radio play by Samuel Beckett. It was written in French in 1961 as Pochade radiophonique and published in Minuit 16, November 1975. Beckett translated the work into English shortly before its broadcast on BBC Radio 3 on 13th April 1976.… …

    Wikipedia

  • 19language — /lang gwij/, n. 1. a body of words and the systems for their use common to a people who are of the same community or nation, the same geographical area, or the same cultural tradition: the two languages of Belgium; a Bantu language; the French… …

    Universalium

  • 20Hinduism — /hin dooh iz euhm/, n. the common religion of India, based upon the religion of the original Aryan settlers as expounded and evolved in the Vedas, the Upanishads, the Bhagavad Gita, etc., having an extremely diversified character with many… …

    Universalium