provide+for+one's+self

  • 1 For One More Day — is a 2006 novel taken place during the mid 1900 s by the acclaimed sportswriter and author Mitch Albom. It opens with the novel s protagonist planning to commit suicide. His adulthood is shown to have been rife with sadness. His own daughter didn …

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  • 2 To appoint one's self — Appoint Ap*point ([a^]p*point ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Appointed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Appointing}.] [OE. appointen, apointen, OF. apointier to prepare, arrange, lean, place, F. appointer to give a salary, refer a cause, fr. LL. appunctare to bring… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 To find one's self — Find Find (f[imac]nd), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Found} (found); p. pr. & vb. n. {Finding}.] [AS. findan; akin to D. vinden, OS. & OHG. findan, G. finden, Dan. finde, icel. & Sw. finna, Goth. fin[thorn]an; and perh. to L. petere to seek, Gr. pi ptein… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 To lay hands on one's self — Lay Lay (l[=a]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Laid} (l[=a]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Laying}.] [OE. leggen, AS. lecgan, causative, fr. licgan to lie; akin to D. leggen, G. legen, Icel. leggja, Goth. lagjan. See {Lie} to be prostrate.] 1. To cause to lie down,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 To lay one's self open to — Lay Lay (l[=a]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Laid} (l[=a]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Laying}.] [OE. leggen, AS. lecgan, causative, fr. licgan to lie; akin to D. leggen, G. legen, Icel. leggja, Goth. lagjan. See {Lie} to be prostrate.] 1. To cause to lie down,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6 To lay one's self out — Lay Lay (l[=a]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Laid} (l[=a]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Laying}.] [OE. leggen, AS. lecgan, causative, fr. licgan to lie; akin to D. leggen, G. legen, Icel. leggja, Goth. lagjan. See {Lie} to be prostrate.] 1. To cause to lie down,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7 To lay violent hands on one's self — Lay Lay (l[=a]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Laid} (l[=a]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Laying}.] [OE. leggen, AS. lecgan, causative, fr. licgan to lie; akin to D. leggen, G. legen, Icel. leggja, Goth. lagjan. See {Lie} to be prostrate.] 1. To cause to lie down,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8 self-reliance — I (Roget s IV) n. Syn. self trust, self confidence, independence; see confidence 2 . II (Roget s Thesaurus II) noun The capacity to manage one s own affairs, make one s own judgments, and provide for oneself: independence, self determination,… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 9 self-determination — I (Roget s IV) n. Syn. privilege, spontaneity, initiative; see will 3 . II (Roget s Thesaurus II) noun The capacity to manage one s own affairs, make one s own judgments, and provide for oneself: independence, self reliance, self sufficiency. See …

    English dictionary for students

  • 10 self-sufficiency — (Roget s Thesaurus II) noun The capacity to manage one s own affairs, make one s own judgments, and provide for oneself: independence, self determination, self reliance. See DEPENDENCE …

    English dictionary for students

  • 11 Self-help groups for mental health — are voluntary associations of people who share a common desire to overcome mental illness or otherwise increase their level of cognitive or emotional wellbeing.cite journal | last = Humphreys | first = Keith | coauthors = Rappaport, Julian |… …

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  • 12 Self-concept — Self construction redirects here. For other uses, see Self construction (disambiguation). Not to be confused with Self awareness, Self consciousness, Self image, or Self perception. Contents 1 Overview 2 A Brief History 3 Academic Self …

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  • 13 Self-verification theory — For self testing in electronics, see built in self test Self verification is a social psychological theory that asserts people want to be known and understood by others according to their firmly held beliefs and feelings about themselves, that is …

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  • 14 Self control — is perceived in a few ways. One of which is philosophical and might be described as the exertion of one s own will on one s personal self their behaviors, actions, thought processes. Much of this comes from the perception of self and the ability… …

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  • 15 Self-defense — For the term as used in international relations, see defensive war. Self defense, self defence (see spelling differences) or private defense is a countermeasure that involves defending oneself, one s property or the well being of another from… …

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  • 16 Self insurance — is a risk management method in which a calculated amount of money is set aside to compensate for the potential future loss. More colloquially, the term self insured is used as a euphemism for uninsured. [http://www.slate.com/id/2075714/] If self… …

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  • 17 Self-categorization theory — Self categorization theory, sometimes referred to as the social identity theory of the group, seeks to explain the assumptions that need to be made about psychological group formation in order to understand social categorization studies on… …

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  • 18 Self-replication — is any process by which a thing might make a copy of itself. Biological cells, given suitable environments, reproduce by cell division. During cell division, DNA is replicated and can be transmitted to offspring during reproduction. Biological… …

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  • 19 Self-fashioning — Self fashioning, a term introduced by Stephen Greenblatt ( Renaissance Self Fashioning , 1980), is used to describe the process of constructing one s identity and public persona according to a set of socially acceptable standards. Greenblatt… …

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  • 20 Self-funded health care — describes a self insurance arrangement whereby an employer provides health or disability benefits to employees by assuming the direct risk for payment of their claims for benefits. The terms of eligibility and coverage are set forth in a plan… …

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