pronounce+with+accent

  • 1 accent — I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle French accenter, from accent intonation, from Latin accentus, from ad + cantus song more at chant Date: 1530 1. a. to pronounce with accent ; stress b. to mark with a written or printed accent 2 …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 2 accent — {{11}}accent (n.) late 14c., particular mode of pronunciation, from M.Fr. accent, from O.Fr. acent (13c.), from L. accentus song added to speech, from ad to (see AD (Cf. ad )) + cantus a singing, pp. of canere to sing (see CHANT (Cf …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 3 accent — I. n. 1. Intonation, cadence, tone, modulation of voice. 2. Stress (on a certain syllable), ictus, cadence, tone, beat. II. v. a. Accentuate, lay stress upon, pronounce with accent, put the ictus on …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 4 accent — accentless, adj. accentuable /ak sen chooh euh beuhl/, adj. n. /ak sent/; v. /ak sent, ak sent /, n. 1. prominence of a syllable in terms of differential loudness, or of pitch, or length, or of a combination of these. 2. degree of prominence of a …

    Universalium

  • 5 accent — ac•cent n. [[t]ˈæk sɛnt[/t]] v. [[t]also ækˈsɛnt[/t]] n. 1) phn prominence of a syllable in terms of differential loudness, pitch, length, or a combination of these 2) phn degree of prominence of a syllable within a word or of a word within a… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 6 accent — n. & v. n. 1 a particular mode of pronunciation, esp. one associated with a particular region or group (Liverpool accent; German accent; upper class accent). 2 prominence given to a syllable by stress or pitch. 3 a mark on a letter or word to… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 7 accent*/ — [ˈæks(ə)nt] noun I 1) [C] a way of pronouncing words that shows what country, region, or social class you come from an upper class British accent[/ex] Tom hasn t lost his broad Irish accent.[/ex] 2) [C] a mark above a letter that shows how you… …

    Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • 8 accent — I UK [ˈæks(ə)nt] / US [ˈækˌsent] noun Word forms accent : singular accent plural accents ** 1) [countable] a way of saying words that shows what country, region, or social class someone comes from an upper class British accent Tom hasn t lost his …

    English dictionary

  • 9 Accent reduction — Accent reduction, also known as accent modification, is a systematic approach used to learn or adopt a new accent. It is the process of learning the sound system (or phonology) of a language or dialect. The methodology involves several steps,… …

    Wikipedia

  • 10 accent — [ak′sent΄; ] chiefly Brit [, ak′sənt; ] for v. [, ak′sent΄, ak sent′] n. [Fr < L accentus < ad , to + cantus, pp. of canere, to sing: a L rendering of Gr prosōidia (see PROSODY), orig. referring to the pitch scheme of Gr verse] 1. the… …

    English World dictionary

  • 11 accent — 1. The noun is stressed on the first syllable and the verb (meaning ‘to lay stress on, to emphasize’ in various senses) on the second. 2. In general use, an accent is ‘individual, local, or national mode of pronunciation’, as in a Scottish accent …

    Modern English usage

  • 12 Pronounce — Pro*nounce , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pronounced}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pronounging}.] [F. prononcer, L. pronunciare; pro before, forth + nunciare, nuntiare, to announce. See {Announce}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To utter articulately; to speak out or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 13 accent — noun /ˈæksɛnt / (say aksent) 1. the distinctive character of a vowel or syllable determined by its degree or pattern of stress or musical tone. 2. any one of the degrees or patterns of stress used in a particular language as essential features of …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 14 accent — ac|cent1 [ˈæksənt US ˈæksent] n [Date: 1500 1600; : French; Origin: Latin accentus, from ad to + cantus song ] 1.) the way someone pronounces the words of a language, showing which country or which part of a country they come from →↑dialect ▪ He… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 15 accent — ac|cent1 [ æk,sent ] noun ** 1. ) count a way of saying words that shows what country, region, or social class someone comes from: a Brooklyn accent a strong accent: Tom hasn t lost his strong Irish accent. put on an accent: The kids all put on a …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 16 accent — 1 noun (C) 1 the way someone pronounces the words of a language, showing which country or which part of a country they come from: Alex spoke Portuguese with a Brazilian accent. | strong/broad accent: a broad Irish accent compare dialect 2 the… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 17 pronounce — v. a. 1. Utter (with proper accent and tone), speak, enunciate, articulate. 2. Declare, affirm, assert, announce. 3. Deliver (as an oration) …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 18 Foreign accent syndrome — is a rare medical condition that usually occurs as a rare side effect of severe brain injury, such as a stroke or a head injury between 1941 and 2006. There have been fifty recorded cases. [cite news |first=Sophie |last=Doughty |coauthors=Hope,… …

    Wikipedia

  • 19 Lancashire dialect and accent — refers to the vernacular speech in Lancashire, one of the counties of England. Simon Elmes book Talking for Britain said that Lancashire dialect is now much less common than it once was, but it is not yet extinct. The terms sometimes includes or… …

    Wikipedia

  • 20 Yorkshire dialect and accent — The Yorkshire dialect refers to the varieties of English used in the Northern England historic county of Yorkshire. These varieties are often referred to as Broad Yorkshire or Tyke. [ cite web|url=http://www.bbc.co.uk/bradford/voices2005/pete… …

    Wikipedia