profuse

  • 1Profuse — Pro*fuse , a. [L. profusus, p. p. of profundere to pour forth or out; pro forward, forth + fundere to pour: cf. F. profus. See {Fuse} to melt.] 1. Pouring forth with fullness or exuberance; bountiful; exceedingly liberal; giving without stint; as …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2profuse — profuse; lavish, prodigal, luxuriant, lush, exuberant carry as their basic meaning giving out or given out in great abundance. What is profuse seems to pour or be poured forth in abundance, without restraint, or in a stream {profuse apologies}… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 3profuse — [prō fyo͞os′, prəfyo͞os′] adj. [ME < L profusus, pp. of profundere, to pour out < pro , forth + fundere, to pour: see PRO 2 & FOUND3] 1. giving or pouring forth freely; generous, often to excess: usually with in [profuse in her apologies] 2 …

    English World dictionary

  • 4Profuse — Pro*fuse , v. t. To pour out; to give or spend liberally; to lavish; to squander. [Obs.] Chapman. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5profuse — I adjective abounding, abundant, affluent, ample, boundless, bounteous, bountiful, copious, countless, crowded, diffuse, discursive, effusus, endless, excessive, exorbitant, extravagant, exuberant, flush, full, garrulous, generous, illimitable,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 6profuse — early 15c., from L. profusus spread out, lavish, extravagant, lit. poured forth, prop. pp. of profundere pour forth, from pro forth + fundere to pour (see FOUND (Cf. found) (2)). Related: Profusive; profusively …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 7profuse — [adj] abundant, excessive abounding, alive with*, ample, aplenty, bounteous, bountiful, copious, crawling with*, dime a dozen*, extravagant, extreme, exuberant, fulsome, galore, generous, immoderate, lavish, liberal, lush, luxuriant, no end*,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 8profuse — ► ADJECTIVE 1) plentiful; abundant. 2) archaic extravagant. DERIVATIVES profusely adverb profuseness noun profusion noun. ORIGIN Latin profusus lavish, spread out …

    English terms dictionary

  • 9profuse — adjective 1) profuse apologies Syn: copious, prolific, abundant, liberal, unstinting, fulsome, effusive, extravagant, lavish, gushing; informal over the top, gushy 2) profuse blooms Syn …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 10profuse — adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin profusus, past participle of profundere to pour forth, from pro forth + fundere to pour more at found Date: 15th century 1. pouring forth liberally ; extravagant < profuse in their thanks > 2.&#8230; …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 11profuse — adj. (cannot stand alone) profuse in (profuse in one s apologies) * * * [prə fjuːs] (cannot stand alone) profuse in (profuse in one s apologies) …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 12profuse — [[t]prəfju͟ːs[/t]] 1) ADJ GRADED: usu ADJ n Profuse sweating, bleeding, or vomiting is sweating, bleeding, or vomiting large amounts. ...a remedy that produces profuse sweating. Derived words: profusely ADV GRADED ADV after v He was bleeding&#8230; …

    English dictionary

  • 13profuse — I (Roget s IV) modif. Syn. abundant, extravagant, lavish, liberal, prodigal, bountiful, overflowing, luxuriant, lush, plentiful, copious, prolific, in profusion, generous, free, munificent, unstinting, profligate, wasteful, overliberal,&#8230; …

    English dictionary for students

  • 14profuse — adj. 1 (often foll. by in, of) lavish; extravagant (was profuse in her generosity). 2 (of a thing) exuberantly plentiful; abundant (profuse bleeding; a profuse variety). Derivatives: profusely adv. profuseness n. profusion n. Etymology: ME f. L&#8230; …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 15profuse — profusely, adv. profuseness, n. /preuh fyoohs /, adj. 1. spending or giving freely and in large amount, often to excess; extravagant (often fol. by in): profuse praise. 2. made or done freely and abundantly: profuse apologies. 3. abundant; in&#8230; …

    Universalium

  • 16profuse — pro|fuse [prəˈfju:s] adj [Date: 1400 1500; : Latin; Origin: , past participle of profundere to pour out ] produced or existing in large quantities ▪ He made profuse apologies . ▪ Profuse sweating is one of the symptoms of heat exhaustion.&#8230; …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 17profuse — adjective 1 given, flowing, or growing freely and in large quantities: profuse tears 2 too eager or generous with your praise, thanks etc (+ in): Stella was profuse in her thanks. profusely adverb: sweating profusely in the heat profuseness noun&#8230; …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 18profuse — pro•fuse [[t]prəˈfyus[/t]] adj. 1) spending or giving freely, often to excess; extravagant (often fol. by in): profuse in their praise[/ex] 2) made or done freely and abundantly: profuse apologies[/ex] 3) abundant; in great amount • Etymology:&#8230; …

    From formal English to slang

  • 19profuse — /prəˈfjus / (say pruh fyoohs) adjective 1. made or done freely and abundantly: profuse apologies. 2. abundant; in great amount. –phrase 3. profuse in, generous to the point of extravagance in the giving of. {Middle English, from Latin profūsus,&#8230; …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 20profuse — adjective /prəˈfjuːs/ In great quantity or abundance. She grew profuse amounts of zucchini and pumpkins …

    Wiktionary