profligate

  • 1 Profligate — Prof li*gate, a. [L. profligatus, p. p. of profligare to strike or dash to the ground, to destroy; pro before + a word akin to fligere to strike. See {Afflict}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Overthrown; beaten; conquered. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] The foe is… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 profligate — [adj1] immoral, corrupt abandoned, debauched, degenerate, depraved, dissipated, dissolute, iniquitous, lax, lewd, libertine, licentious, loose, promiscuous, reprobate, shameless, unprincipled, vicious, vitiated, wanton, wicked, wild; concept 545… …

    New thesaurus

  • 3 Profligate — Prof li*gate, n. An abandoned person; one openly and shamelessly vicious; a dissolute person. Such a profligate as Antony. Swift. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 profligate# — profligate adj dissolute, reprobate, *abandoned Analogous words: debauched, corrupted, depraved, debased, perverted (see under DEBASE): degenerate, corrupt, *vicious: ioose, relaxed, slack, lax profligate n *spendthrift, prodigal, wastrel, waster …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 5 profligate — ► ADJECTIVE 1) recklessly extravagant or wasteful. 2) licentious; dissolute. ► NOUN ▪ a profligate person. DERIVATIVES profligacy noun. ORIGIN Latin profligatus dissolute , from profligare overthrow, ruin …

    English terms dictionary

  • 6 profligate — [präf′li git] adj. [L profligatus, pp. of profligare, to strike to the ground, rout, ruin < pro , forward (see PRO 2) + fligere, to drive, dash (see INFLICT)] 1. immoral and shameless 2. extremely wasteful; recklessly extravagant n. a… …

    English World dictionary

  • 7 Profligate — Prof li*gate, v. t. To drive away; to overcome. Note: [A Latinism] [Obs.] Harvey. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8 profligate — I (corrupt) adjective abandoned to vice, base, corrupted, debauched, degenerate, depraved, disgraceful, disreputable, dissipated, dissipative, dissolute, evil, evil minded, fallen, flagitious, foul, heinous, immoral, indecent, infamous,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 9 profligate — (adj.) 1520s, overthrown (implied in profligation), from L. profligatus destroyed, dissolute, pp. of profligare to cast down, defeat, ruin, from pro down, forth (see PRO (Cf. pro )) + fligere to strike (see AFFLICT (Cf. afflict …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 10 profligate — prof|li|gate [ˈprɔflıgıt US ˈpra: ] adj formal [Date: 1500 1600; : Latin; Origin: , past participle of profligare to strike down ] 1.) wasting money or other things in a careless way = ↑wasteful ▪ profligate spending ▪ the profligate use of… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 11 profligate — 1. adjective 1) profligate local authorities Syn: wasteful, extravagant, spendthrift, improvident, prodigal Ant: thrifty, frugal 2) a profligate lifestyle Syn: dissolute …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 12 profligate — [[t]prɒ̱flɪgɪt[/t]] ADJ GRADED Someone who is profligate spends too much money or uses too much of something. [FORMAL] ...the most profligate consumer of energy in the world. Syn: wasteful Ant: careful …

    English dictionary

  • 13 profligate — 1 adjective formal 1 wasting money in a silly and careless way: profligate spending of the taxpayer s money 2 behaving in an immoral way and not caring about it at all profligacy noun (U) 2 noun (C) formal someone who is profligate …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 14 profligate — profligately, adv. profligateness, n. /prof li git, gayt /, adj. 1. utterly and shamelessly immoral or dissipated; thoroughly dissolute. 2. recklessly prodigal or extravagant. n. 3. a profligate person. [1525 35; < L profligatus broken down in… …

    Universalium

  • 15 profligate — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) adj. wanton, reckless, wild, intemperate; extravagant, wasteful. n. roué, rake, libertine, lecher, reprobate; wastrel, spendthrift, squanderer, playboy. See waste, impurity, evildoer. Ant., economical.… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 16 profligate — prof|li|gate1 [ praflıgət ] adjective FORMAL wasting money or other things ╾ prof|li|ga|cy noun uncount profligate prof|li|gate 2 [ praflıgət ] noun count someone who wastes things and does not think about the effects of their actions …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 17 profligate — [16] Something that is profligate has etymologically been ‘beaten down’ to a state of ruination or degradation. The word was adapted from Latin prōflīgātus ‘destroyed, dissolute’, an adjective based on the past participle of prōflīgāre ‘beat down …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 18 profligate — [ prɒflɪgət] adjective recklessly extravagant or wasteful. ↘licentious; dissolute. noun a profligate person. Derivatives profligacy noun profligately adverb Origin C16: from L. profligatus dissolute , past participle of profligare overthrow, ruin …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 19 profligate — prof•li•gate [[t]ˈprɒf lɪ gɪt, ˌgeɪt[/t]] adj. 1) utterly and shamelessly immoral or dissipated; thoroughly dissolute 2) recklessly prodigal or extravagant 3) a profligate person • Etymology: 1525–35; < L prōflīgātus broken down in character,… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 20 profligate — /ˈprɒfləgət / (say profluhguht) adjective 1. utterly and shamelessly immoral; thoroughly dissolute. 2. recklessly prodigal or extravagant. –noun 3. a profligate person. {Latin prōflīgātus, past participle, overthrown, ruined} –profligately,… …

    Australian English dictionary