prefer

  • 1 prefer — 1. The inflected forms of the verb are preferred, preferring, but other derivatives have a single r (preferable, preferably, preference, preferential, preferment). 2. When the subject of prefer is the same as that of a following subordinate verb …

    Modern English usage

  • 2 Prefer — Pre*fer , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Preferred}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Preferring}.] [F. pr[ e]f[ e]rer, L. praeferre; prae before + ferre to bear or carry. See 1st {Bear}.] 1. To carry or bring (something) forward, or before one; hence, to bring for… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 prefer — pre·fer /pri fər/ vt pre·ferred, pre·fer·ring 1: to give (a creditor or debt) priority or preference any preferred charges such as child support or alimony In re Smiley, 427 P.2d 179 (1967) 2: to bring forward for determination; esp: to bring (a… …

    Law dictionary

  • 4 prefer — [prē fʉr′, prifʉr′] vt. preferred, preferring [ME preferren < MFr preferer < L praeferre, to place before < prae , PRE + ferre, BEAR1] 1. to put before someone else in rank, office, etc.; promote; advance 2. to put before a magistrate,… …

    English World dictionary

  • 5 prefer — late 14c., to put forward or advance in rank or fortune, to promote, from L. praeferre place or set before, carry in front, from prae before (see PRE (Cf. pre )) + ferre to carry, to place (see INFER (Cf. infer)). Meaning to esteem (something)… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 6 prefer — 1 *choose, select, elect, opt, pick, cull, single Analogous words: accept, *receive, admit, take: *approve, endorse, sanction: favor, *oblige, accommodate 2 *offer, proffer, tender, pr …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 7 prefer — [v] favor; single out adopt, advance, aggrandize, be partial to, be turned on to, choose, cull, desire, elect, elevate, fancy, finger, fix upon, go for, incline, like better, mark, optate, opt for, pick, place, pose, present, promote, propone,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 8 prefer — ► VERB (preferred, preferring) 1) like (someone or something) better than another or others; tend to choose. 2) formal submit (a charge or information) for consideration. 3) archaic promote to a prestigious position. ORIGIN Latin praeferre bear… …

    English terms dictionary

  • 9 prefer */*/*/ — UK [prɪˈfɜː(r)] / US [prɪˈfɜr] verb [transitive] Word forms prefer : present tense I/you/we/they prefer he/she/it prefers present participle preferring past tense preferred past participle preferred [never progressive] to like or want someone or… …

    English dictionary

  • 10 prefer — v. 1) (D; tr.) ( to bring ) to prefer against (to prefer charges against smb.) 2) (D; tr.) to prefer to (she prefers fish to meat) 3) (E) we prefer to remain at home 4) (G) I preferred going to a concert 5) (esp. BE) (H; no passive) I d prefer… …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 11 prefer — pre|fer [ prı fɜr ] verb transitive *** never progressive to like or want someone or something more than someone or something else: Which do you prefer, the red or the blue one? prefer someone/something to someone/something: Even today, most… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 12 prefer — verb preferred, preferring (transitive not in progressive) 1 to like someone or something more than someone or something else: “What kind of music do you like?” “These days I prefer classical music” | prefer sb/sth to sb/sth: I much prefer dogs… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 13 prefer — verb ADVERB ▪ greatly, much, overwhelmingly, strongly, vastly ▪ I greatly prefer this version. ▪ I much prefer the orchestra s 1998 recording of the symphony …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 14 prefer — pre|fer W2S2 [prıˈfə: US ˈfə:r] v past tense and past participle preferred present participle preferring [T not in progressive] [Date: 1300 1400; : French; Origin: préférer, from Latin praeferre to put in front, prefer ] 1.) to like someone or… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 15 prefer — 01. I much [prefer] locally made beer to the kind made by the big breweries. 02. Francis thought marmalade on toast was [preferable] to strawberry jam. 03. I would like to travel to Europe next spring, [preferably] to Italy. 04. Joseph likes… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 16 prefer — [[t]prɪfɜ͟ː(r)[/t]] ♦♦ prefers, preferring, preferred VERB: no cont If you prefer someone or something, you like that person or thing better than another, and so you are more likely to choose them if there is a choice. [V n] Does he prefer a… …

    English dictionary

  • 17 prefer*/*/*/ — [prɪˈfɜː] verb [T] to like or want someone or something more than someone or something else Which do you prefer, the red or the blue one?[/ex] Even today, most Americans prefer coffee to tea.[/ex] Do you prefer to exercise indoors or out of… …

    Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • 18 prefer — /prəˈfɜ / (say pruh fer) verb (t) (preferred, preferring) 1. to set or hold before or above other persons or things in estimation; like better; choose rather: to prefer films to books. 2. Law to give priority, as to one creditor over another. 3.… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 19 prefer — pre•fer [[t]prɪˈfɜr[/t]] v. t. ferred, fer•ring 1) to set or hold before or above other persons or things in estimation; like better: I prefer school to work[/ex] 2) law to give priority to, as to one creditor over another 3) to put forward or… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 20 prefer — transitive verb (preferred; preferring) Etymology: Middle English preferren, from Anglo French preferrer, from Latin praeferre to put before, prefer, from prae + ferre to carry more at bear Date: 14th century 1. to promote or advance to a rank or …

    New Collegiate Dictionary