miserable+person

  • 1miserable — [miz′ər ə bəl, miz′rəbəl] adj. [Fr misérable < L miserabilis, pitiable < miserari, to pity < miser, wretched] 1. in a condition of misery; wretched, unhappy, suffering, etc. 2. causing misery, discomfort, or suffering [miserable weather] …

    English World dictionary

  • 2Miserable — Mis er*a*ble, n. A miserable person. [Obs.] Sterne. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3miserable — mis|er|a|ble [ mız(ə)rəbl ] adjective * 1. ) extremely unhappy or uncomfortable: He looked cold and miserable in the rain. Their evening together had been a miserable failure. a ) a miserable situation or period is one that makes you feel very… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 4miserable */ — UK [ˈmɪz(ə)rəb(ə)l] / US adjective 1) extremely unhappy or uncomfortable He looked cold and miserable in the rain. Their evening together had been a miserable failure. a) a miserable situation or period is one that makes you feel very unhappy The …

    English dictionary

  • 5miserable — miserable, wretched both describe something (as a person s state of health or of mind, a state of affairs, a human being with reference to his condition or character, or a thing compared with others of its kind) that is deplorably or contemptibly …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 6miserable — 01. The lads felt [miserable] after losing the game in a shoot out. 02. We were thinking of going camping, but with this [miserable] weather I think we d better wait until next week. 03. She felt [miserable], so she went to bed early. 04. Grandpa …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 7miserable — mis·er·a·ble || mɪzÉ™rÉ™bl n. wretch, poor person; sorry person, desolate person adj. unhappy, dejected, wretched …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 8miserable — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) adj. wretched, forlorn, doleful; mean, contemptible, paltry. See unimportance. Ant., happy, wealthy. II (Roget s IV) modif. 1. [In misery] Syn. distressed, afflicted, sickly, ill, wretched, sick, ailing …

    English dictionary for students

  • 9Mr. Monk is Miserable —   …

    Wikipedia

  • 10hangdog — /ˈhæŋdɒg/ (say hangdog) adjective 1. having a dejected, guilty or pitiful aspect. 2. of or relating to a degraded, contemptible or miserable person. –noun 3. British, US a degraded, contemptible, or miserable person …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 11Sherilyn Fenn — Infobox actor name = Sherilyn Fenn caption = birthname = Sheryl Ann Fenn birthdate = birth date and age|1965|2|1 birthplace = deathdate = deathplace = restingplace = restingplacecoordinates = othername = occupation = actress yearsactive = 1983… …

    Wikipedia

  • 12wretch — retʃ n. unhappy person, miserable person, poor person; despicable or contemptible person, one who is scorned; mean or base person …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 13wretches — retʃ n. unhappy person, miserable person, poor person; despicable or contemptible person, one who is scorned; mean or base person …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 14Monster (manga) — Monster Promotional image of Monster anime series モンスター (Monsutā) Genre Psychologi …

    Wikipedia

  • 15worm — /wɜm / (say werm) noun 1. Zoology any of the long, slender, soft bodied bilateral invertebrates including the flatworms, roundworms, acanthocephalans, nemerteans, and annelids. 2. (in popular language) any of numerous small creeping animals with… …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 16wretch — [[t]rɛtʃ[/t]] n. 1) a deplorably unfortunate or unhappy person 2) a person of despicable or base character • Etymology: bef. 900; ME wrecche, OE wrecca miserable person, exile, c. OS wrekkio, OHG reccheo …

    From formal English to slang

  • 17Wretch — Wretch, n. [OE. wrecche, AS. wrecca, wr[ae]cca, an exile, a wretch, fr. wrecan to drive out, punish; properly, an exile, one driven out, akin to AS. wr[ae]c an exile, OS. wrekkio a stranger, OHG. reccheo an exile. See {Wreak}, v. t.] [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 18wretch — noun Etymology: Middle English wrecche, from Old English wrecca outcast, exile; akin to Old High German hrechjo fugitive, Old English wrecan to drive, drive out more at wreak Date: before 12th century 1. a miserable person ; one who is profoundly …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 19Ironweed — This article is about the novel. For the film, see Ironweed (film). For the plant, see Vernonia Ironweed is a 1983 novel by William Kennedy. It received the 1984 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and is part of Kennedy s Albany Cycle. It placed at… …

    Wikipedia

  • 20James Allen (author) — James Allen (born November 28 1864 in Leicester, England died 1912) was a philosophical writer of British nationality known for his inspirational books and poetry. Background Allen was 15 when his father, a businessman, was robbed and murdered.… …

    Wikipedia