marked+degree

  • 1Degree — De*gree , n. [F. degr[ e], OF. degret, fr. LL. degradare. See {Degrade}.] 1. A step, stair, or staircase. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] By ladders, or else by degree. Rom. of R. [1913 Webster] 2. One of a series of progressive steps upward or downward,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2Degree of a curve — Degree De*gree , n. [F. degr[ e], OF. degret, fr. LL. degradare. See {Degrade}.] 1. A step, stair, or staircase. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] By ladders, or else by degree. Rom. of R. [1913 Webster] 2. One of a series of progressive steps upward or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3Degree of a surface — Degree De*gree , n. [F. degr[ e], OF. degret, fr. LL. degradare. See {Degrade}.] 1. A step, stair, or staircase. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] By ladders, or else by degree. Rom. of R. [1913 Webster] 2. One of a series of progressive steps upward or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4Degree of latitude — Degree De*gree , n. [F. degr[ e], OF. degret, fr. LL. degradare. See {Degrade}.] 1. A step, stair, or staircase. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] By ladders, or else by degree. Rom. of R. [1913 Webster] 2. One of a series of progressive steps upward or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5Degree of longitude — Degree De*gree , n. [F. degr[ e], OF. degret, fr. LL. degradare. See {Degrade}.] 1. A step, stair, or staircase. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] By ladders, or else by degree. Rom. of R. [1913 Webster] 2. One of a series of progressive steps upward or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6degree — degreed, adj. degreeless, adj. /di gree /, n. 1. any of a series of steps or stages, as in a process or course of action; a point in any scale. 2. a stage or point in or as if in progression or retrogression: We followed the degrees of her… …

    Universalium

  • 7degree — noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French degré, from Vulgar Latin *degradus, from Latin de + gradus Date: 13th century 1. a step or stage in a process, course, or order of classification < advanced by degrees > 2 …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 8degree — de•gree [[t]dɪˈgri[/t]] n. 1) any of a series of steps or stages, as in a process or course of action; a point in any scale 2) cvb a stage or point in or as if in progression or retrogression: We followed the degrees of her recovery with joy[/ex] …

    From formal English to slang

  • 9degree — 1. One of the divisions on the scale of a measuring instrument such as a thermometer, barometer, etc. See Comparative Temperature Scales appendix. See scale. 2. The 360th part of the circumference of a circle. 3. A position or …

    Medical dictionary

  • 10To a degree — Degree De*gree , n. [F. degr[ e], OF. degret, fr. LL. degradare. See {Degrade}.] 1. A step, stair, or staircase. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] By ladders, or else by degree. Rom. of R. [1913 Webster] 2. One of a series of progressive steps upward or&#8230; …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 11British undergraduate degree classification — The British undergraduate degree classification system is a grading scheme for undergraduate degrees (bachelor s degrees and integrated master s degrees) in the United Kingdom. The system has been applied (sometimes with significant variations)&#8230; …

    Wikipedia

  • 12second-degree burn — n a burn marked by pain, blistering, and superficial destruction of dermis with edema and hyperemia of the tissues beneath the burn * * * a burn that affects the epidermis and the dermis, classified as superficial or deep according to the depth&#8230; …

    Medical dictionary

  • 13second-degree burn — noun Date: 1937 a burn marked by pain, blistering, and superficial destruction of dermis with edema and hyperemia of the tissues beneath the burn …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 14France — /frans, frahns/; Fr. /frddahonns/, n. 1. Anatole /ann nann tawl /, (Jacques Anatole Thibault), 1844 1924, French novelist and essayist: Nobel prize 1921. 2. a republic in W Europe. 58,470,421; 212,736 sq. mi. (550,985 sq. km). Cap.: Paris. 3.&#8230; …

    Universalium

  • 15Europe, history of — Introduction       history of European peoples and cultures from prehistoric times to the present. Europe is a more ambiguous term than most geographic expressions. Its etymology is doubtful, as is the physical extent of the area it designates.&#8230; …

    Universalium

  • 16KABBALAH — This entry is arranged according to the following outline: introduction general notes terms used for kabbalah the historical development of the kabbalah the early beginnings of mysticism and esotericism apocalyptic esotericism and merkabah&#8230; …

    Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • 17Greatness — (Roget s Thesaurus) &LT; N PARAG:Greatness &GT;N GRP: N 1 Sgm: N 1 greatness greatness &c. &GT;Adj. Sgm: N 1 magnitude magnitude Sgm: N 1 size size &c.(dimensions) 192 Sgm: N 1 multitude multitude &c.(number) 102 Sgm: N 1 …

    English dictionary for students

  • 18pottery — /pot euh ree/, n., pl. potteries. 1. ceramic ware, esp. earthenware and stoneware. 2. the art or business of a potter; ceramics. 3. a place where earthen pots or vessels are made. [1475 85; POTTER1 + Y3] * * * I One of the oldest and most&#8230; …

    Universalium

  • 19French Literature — • Origin, foundations, and types Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. French Literature     French Literature     † …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 20interior design — 1. the design and coordination of the decorative elements of the interior of a house, apartment, office, or other structural space, including color schemes, fittings, furnishings, and sometimes architectural features. 2. the art, business, or&#8230; …

    Universalium