make+accountable

  • 1make accountable for — index encumber (financially obligate) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 2accountable — adj. VERBS ▪ be ▪ become ▪ make sb ▪ hold sb ▪ The directors are held accountable by the shareholders. ADVERB …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 3accountable receipt — A receipt in writing in which the receiptor not only admits receiving the money paid or goods delivered to him, but also acknowledges his undertaking to make payment or delivery thereof, or a part thereof, to a third party …

    Ballentine's law dictionary

  • 4subject — I. v. a. 1. Subdue, control, bring under rule, make submissive, make subordinate. 2. Enslave, enthrall. 3. Expose, make liable. 4. Submit, refer, make accountable. 5. Make subservient. 6. Cause to undergo. II. a …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 5Subject — Sub*ject , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Subjected}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Subjecting}.] 1. To bring under control, power, or dominion; to make subject; to subordinate; to subdue. [1913 Webster] Firmness of mind that subjects every gratification of sense to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6Subjected — Subject Sub*ject , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Subjected}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Subjecting}.] 1. To bring under control, power, or dominion; to make subject; to subordinate; to subdue. [1913 Webster] Firmness of mind that subjects every gratification of… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7Subjecting — Subject Sub*ject , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Subjected}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Subjecting}.] 1. To bring under control, power, or dominion; to make subject; to subordinate; to subdue. [1913 Webster] Firmness of mind that subjects every gratification of… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8encumber — en·cum·ber also in·cum·ber /in kəm bər/ vt bered, ber·ing: to burden with a claim (as a mortgage or lien) encumber ed the land with a mineral lease Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996 …

    Law dictionary

  • 9hold — hold1 holdable, adj. /hohld/, v., held; held or (Archaic) holden; holding; n. v.t. 1. to have or keep in the hand; keep fast; grasp: She held the purse in her right hand. He held the child s hand in his. 2. to set aside; reserve or retain: to… …

    Universalium

  • 10hold — I [[t]hoʊld[/t]] v. held, hold•ing, n. 1) to have or keep in the hand; grasp: to hold someone s hand[/ex] 2) to set aside; reserve or retain: to hold a reservation[/ex] 3) to bear, sustain, or support with or as if with the hands or arms 4) to… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 11Restorative justice — Criminology and penology Theories Causes and correlates of crime Anomie Differential association theory Deviance …

    Wikipedia

  • 12United Kingdom company law — Beside the River Thames, the City of London is a global financial centre. Within the Square Mile, the London Stock Exchange lies at the heart of the United Kingdom s corporations. United Kingdom company law is the body of rules that concern… …

    Wikipedia

  • 13police — /peuh lees /, n., v., policed, policing. n. 1. Also called police force. an organized civil force for maintaining order, preventing and detecting crime, and enforcing the laws. 2. (used with a pl. v.) members of such a force: Several police are… …

    Universalium

  • 14Public management — considers that government and non profit administration resembles private sector management in some important ways. As such, there are management tools appropriate in public and in private domains, tools that maximize efficiency and effectiveness …

    Wikipedia

  • 15Oxfam — Logo Oxfam is an international confederation of 15 organisations working in 98 countries worldwide to find lasting solutions to poverty and related injustice around the world.[1] In all Oxfam’s actions, the ultimate goal is to enable people to… …

    Wikipedia

  • 16Russia — /rush euh/, n. 1. Also called Russian Empire. Russian, Rossiya. a former empire in E Europe and N and W Asia: overthrown by the Russian Revolution 1917. Cap.: St. Petersburg (1703 1917). 2. See Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. 3. See Russian… …

    Universalium

  • 17No Child Left Behind Act — President Bush signing the bipartisan No Child Left Behind Act at Hamilton H.S. in Hamilton, Ohio. No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 …

    Wikipedia

  • 18Theodicy — (IPAEng|θiːˈɒdɪsi) (adjectival form theodicean) is a specific branch of theology and philosophy that attempts to reconcile the existence of evil or suffering in the world with the belief in an omniscient, omnipotent, and omnibenevolent God, i.e …

    Wikipedia

  • 19Diarmuid Martin — The Most Reverend  Diarmuid Martin Archbishop of Dublin and Primate of Ireland Diocese Dublin See Dublin Enthroned …

    Wikipedia

  • 20Denial — For the politics of science/history and public policy, see Denialism. For other uses, see Denial (disambiguation). Denial (also called abnegation) is a defense mechanism postulated by Sigmund Freud, in which a person is faced with a fact that is… …

    Wikipedia