inordinate

  • 1 Inordinate — In*or di*nate, a. [L. inordinatus disordered. See {In } not, and {Ordinate}.] Not limited to rules prescribed, or to usual bounds; irregular; excessive; immoderate; as, an inordinate love of the world. Inordinate desires. Milton. Inordinate… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 inordinate — I adjective crammed, exaggerated, exceeding, excessive, exorbitant, extortionate, extraordinary, extravagant, extreme, fanatical, gluttonous, great, immoderate, immoderatus, immodicus, inabstinent, intemperate, lavish, monstrous, needless,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 3 inordinate — (adj.) late 14c., not ordered, lacking order or regularity, from L. inordinatus unordered, not arranged, from in not, opposite of (see IN (Cf. in ) (1)) + ordinatus, pp. of ordinare to set in order (see ORDER (Cf. order)). Sense of immoderate,… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 4 inordinate — *excessive, immoderate, exorbitant, extreme, extravagant Analogous words: irrational, unreasonable: *supererogatory, wanton, uncalled for, gratuitous: *superfluous, surplus, extra Antonyms: ordinate (rare): temperate Contrasted words: *moderate:… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 5 inordinate — [adj] excessive, extravagant disproportionate, dizzying, exorbitant, extortionate, extreme, gratuitous, immoderate, intemperate, irrational, outrageous, overindulgent, overmuch, preposterous, supererogatory, superfluous, surplus, too much,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 6 inordinate — ► ADJECTIVE ▪ unusually large; excessive. DERIVATIVES inordinately adverb. ORIGIN originally in the sense «disorderly»: from Latin inordinatus, from in not + ordinatus set in order …

    English terms dictionary

  • 7 inordinate — [in ôrd′ n it] adj. [ME inordinat < L inordinatus < in , IN 2 + ordinatus, pp. of ordinare, to arrange: see ORDAIN] 1. disordered; not regulated 2. lacking restraint or moderation; too great or too many; immoderate SYN. EXCESSIVE… …

    English World dictionary

  • 8 inordinate — inordinately, adv. inordinateness, n. /in awr dn it/, adj. 1. not within proper or reasonable limits; immoderate; excessive: He drank an inordinate amount of wine. 2. unrestrained in conduct, feelings, etc.: an inordinate admirer of beauty. 3.… …

    Universalium

  • 9 inordinate — [[t]ɪnɔ͟ː(r)dɪnɪt[/t]] ADJ: usu ADJ n (emphasis) If you describe something as inordinate, you are emphasizing that it is unusually or excessively great in amount or degree. [FORMAL] They spend an inordinate amount of time talking. ...their… …

    English dictionary

  • 10 inordinate — in•or•di•nate [[t]ɪnˈɔr dn ɪt[/t]] adj. 1) not within proper limits; excessive: to drink an inordinate amount of wine[/ex] 2) unrestrained in conduct, feelings, etc.: an inordinate lover of antiques[/ex] 3) disorderly; uncontrolled 4) not… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 11 inordinate — /ɪnˈɔdənət / (say in awduhnuht) adjective 1. not within proper limits; excessive: inordinate demands. 2. disorderly. 3. unrestrained in conduct, etc. 4. irregular: inordinate hours. {Middle English inordinat, from Latin inordinātus disordered}… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 12 inordinate — adj. Inordinate is used with these nouns: ↑amount, ↑delay, ↑length, ↑number …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 13 inordinate — in|or|di|nate [ıˈno:dənıt US o:r ] adj [Date: 1300 1400; : Latin; Origin: inordinatus, from ordinare to arrange ] far more than you would reasonably or normally expect = ↑excessive ▪ Testing is taking up an inordinate amount of teachers time.… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 14 inordinate — in|or|di|nate [ ın ɔrdınət ] adjective usually before noun FORMAL much more than you would usually expect: used for emphasizing how large something is or how much of something there is: It all took an inordinate amount of time. ╾ in|or|di|nate|ly …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 15 inordinate — adjective far more than you would reasonably or normally expect: Testing is taking up an inordinate amount of teachers time. inordinately adverb: She s inordinately fond of her parrot …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 16 inordinate — adjective don t you think this is an inordinate amount of luggage for one weekend? Syn: excessive, undue, unreasonable, unjustifiable, unwarrantable, disproportionate, unwarranted, unnecessary, needless, uncalled for, gratuitous, exorbitant,… …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 17 inordinate — UK [ɪnˈɔː(r)dɪnət] / US [ɪnˈɔrdɪnət] adjective [usually before noun] formal much more than you would usually expect: used for emphasizing how large something is or how much of something there is It all took an inordinate amount of time. Derived… …

    English dictionary

  • 18 inordinate — adjective Etymology: Middle English inordinat, from Latin inordinatus, from in + ordinatus, past participle of ordinare to arrange more at ordain Date: 14th century 1. archaic disorderly, unregulated 2. exceeding reasonable limits ; immoderate… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 19 inordinate — adjective Excessive; unreasonable or inappropriate in magnitude; extreme …

    Wiktionary

  • 20 inordinate — Synonyms and related words: a bit much, abandoned, aggrandized, amplified, ballyhooed, bibulous, bigoted, boundless, crapulent, crapulous, cutthroat, disproportionate, dizzy, egregious, enormous, exacting, exaggerated, excessive, exorbitant,… …

    Moby Thesaurus