infuse

  • 1infuse — When using the word in its physical meaning, you can infuse (a plant, herb, etc.) in a liquid in order to extract its properties, or (by a linguistic process that Fowler called ‘object shuffling’) you can infuse (a liquid) by inserting something… …

    Modern English usage

  • 2infuse — ● infuse adjectif féminin (latin infusus, de infundere, répandre) Avoir la science infuse, prétendre savoir quelque chose sans avoir besoin d étudier. ● infuse (expressions) adjectif féminin (latin infusus, de infundere, répandre) Avoir la… …

    Encyclopédie Universelle

  • 3infusé — ● infuse adjectif féminin (latin infusus, de infundere, répandre) Avoir la science infuse, prétendre savoir quelque chose sans avoir besoin d étudier. ● infuse (expressions) adjectif féminin (latin infusus, de infundere, répandre) Avoir la… …

    Encyclopédie Universelle

  • 4infuse — infuse, suffuse, imbue, ingrain, inoculate, leaven mean to introduce one thing into another so as to affect it throughout. Infuse implies a permeating like that of infiltering fluid, usually of something which imbues the recipient with new spirit …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 5Infuse — In*fuse , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Infused}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Infusing}.] [L. infusus, p. p. of infundere to pour in or into; pref. in in + fundere to pour: cf. F. infuser. See {Found} to cast.] 1. To pour in, as a liquid; to pour (into or upon); to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6infusé — infusé, ée (in fu zé, zée) part. passé d infuser. 1°   Qu on a fait pénétrer sous forme liquide. Une liqueur infusée dans les veines.    Qui a trempé dans un liquide. De la camomille infusée dans de l eau. •   Plusieurs perles d un prix infini… …

    Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • 7Infuse — In*fuse, n. Infusion. [Obs.] Spenser. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8infuse — I verb imbrue, imbue, implant, impregnate, inculcate, incutere, infundere, ingrain, inicere, inject, insert, inspire, inspirit, instill, introduce II index denature, develop …

    Law dictionary

  • 9infuse — (v.) early 15c., to pour in, introduce, soak, from L. infusus, pp. of infundere to pour into, from in in (see IN (Cf. in ) (2)) + fundere pour, spread (see FOUND (Cf. found) (2)). Figurative sense of instill, inspire first recorded 1520s (inf …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 10infuse — [v] introduce; soak animate, breathe into, imbue, impart, implant, impregnate, inculcate, indoctrinate, ingrain, inoculate, inspire, instill, intersperse, invest, leaven, permeate, pervade, plant, saturate, steep, suffuse; concepts 140,179,187 …

    New thesaurus

  • 11infusé — Infusé, [infus]ée. part …

    Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • 12infuse — ► VERB 1) pervade; fill. 2) instil (a quality) in someone or something. 3) soak (tea, herbs, etc.) to extract the flavour or healing properties. 4) Medicine allow (a liquid) to flow into the bloodstream or a part of the body. DERIVATIVES infuser… …

    English terms dictionary

  • 13infuse — [in fyo͞oz′] vt. infused, infusing [ME infusen < L infusus, pp. of infundere, to pour in < in , in + fundere, to pour: see FOUND2] 1. Obs. to pour (a liquid) in, into, or upon 2. to put (a quality, idea, etc.) into, as if by pouring;… …

    English World dictionary

  • 14infuse — [[t]ɪnfju͟ːz[/t]] infuses, infusing, infused 1) VERB To infuse a quality into someone or something, or to infuse them with a quality, means to fill them with it. [FORMAL] [be V ed with n] Many of the girls seemed to be infused with excitement on… …

    English dictionary

  • 15infuse — UK [ɪnˈfjuːz] / US [ɪnˈfjuz] verb Word forms infuse : present tense I/you/we/they infuse he/she/it infuses present participle infusing past tense infused past participle infused 1) [transitive] to give someone or something a particular quality… …

    English dictionary

  • 16infuse — verb 1 formal (T) to fill something or someone with a particular feeling or quality: infuse sth/sb with: She managed to infuse the situation with humour. | infuse sth into: Hannah wanted desperately to infuse some vitality into their dull… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 17infuse — in|fuse [ ın fjuz ] verb 1. ) transitive to give someone or something a particular quality: infuse something into: The best teachers manage to infuse vitality into the most boring subjects. infuse something/someone with something: Her paintings… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 18infuse — v. (d; tr.) to infuse into (to infuse new life into the troops) * * * [ɪn fjuːz] (d; tr.) to infuse into (to infuse new life into the troops) …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 19infuse — transitive verb (infused; infusing) Etymology: Middle English, to pour in, from Middle French & Latin; Middle French infuser, from Latin infusus, past participle of infundere to pour in, from in + fundere to pour more at found Date: 1526 1. a. to …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 20infuse — in|fuse [ınˈfju:z] v [Date: 1400 1500; : French; Origin: infuser, from Latin infundere, from fundere to pour ] 1.) [T] formal to fill something or someone with a particular feeling or quality be infused with sth ▪ Her books are infused with… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English