induct

  • 1 induct — in‧duct [ɪnˈdʌkt] verb [transitive] HUMAN RESOURCES to officially introduce someone into a new job or organization, usually through a special ceremony: induct somebody into something • Mr Clay will be inducted into the company as president at a… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 2 Induct — In*duct , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Inducted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Inducting}.] [L. inductus, p. p. of inducere. See {Induce}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To bring in; to introduce; to usher in. [1913 Webster] The independent orator inducting himself without… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 induct — I verb admit, appoint, assign, bring in, call up, commission, conscript, delegate, employ, engage, give entrance to, impress, inaugurare, inaugurate, initiate, install, instate, introduce, introduce into office, invest, license, name, nominate,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 4 induct — (v.) late 14c., from L. inductus, pp. of inducere to lead (see INDUCE (Cf. induce)). Originally of church offices; sense of bring into military service is 1934 in Amer.Eng. Related: Inducted; inducting …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 5 induct — inaugurate, install, initiate, invest …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 6 induct — [v] take into an organization conscript, draft, enlist, inaugurate, initiate, install, instate, introduce, invest, recruit, sign on, sign up, swear in; concepts 50,88,320,384 Ant. blackball, expel, reject, turn away …

    New thesaurus

  • 7 induct — ► VERB 1) admit formally to a post or organization. 2) US enlist (someone) for military service. DERIVATIVES inductee noun. ORIGIN Latin inducere lead in …

    English terms dictionary

  • 8 induct — [in dukt′] vt. [ME inducten < L inductus, pp. of inducere: see INDUCE] 1. Obs. to bring or lead in 2. to place in a benefice or official position with formality or ceremony; install 3. a) to bring formally into a society or organization;… …

    English World dictionary

  • 9 induct — v. (D; tr.) to induct into (to induct smb. into the armed forces) * * * [ɪn dʌkt] (D; tr.) to induct into (to induct smb. into the armed forces) …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 10 induct — in|duct [ınˈdʌkt] v [T usually passive] formal [Date: 1300 1400; : Latin; Origin: , past participle of inducere; INDUCE] 1.) to officially give someone a job or position of authority, especially at a special ceremony induct sb to/into sth ▪ 18… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 11 induct — UK [ɪnˈdʌkt] / US verb [transitive] Word forms induct : present tense I/you/we/they induct he/she/it inducts present participle inducting past tense inducted past participle inducted formal 1) to officially give someone a new job or position,… …

    English dictionary

  • 12 induct — /in dukt /, v.t. 1. to install in an office, benefice, position, etc., esp. with formal ceremonies: The committee inducted her as president. 2. to introduce, esp. to something requiring special knowledge or experience; initiate (usually fol. by… …

    Universalium

  • 13 induct — in|duct [ ın dʌkt ] verb transitive FORMAL 1. ) AMERICAN to officially accept someone into a group a ) AMERICAN to officially take someone into the military: induct someone into something: Hammer was inducted into the German army in October 1942 …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 14 induct — [ɪn dʌkt] verb 1》 admit formally to a post or organization.     ↘formally introduce (a member of the clergy) into possession of a benefice.     ↘US enlist (someone) for military service. 2》 archaic install in a seat or room. Derivatives inductee… …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 15 induct — /ɪnˈdʌkt / (say in dukt) verb (t) 1. to lead or bring in; introduce, especially formally, as into an office or position, etc. 2. US to call up for military service. –phrase 3. induct to, to introduce in knowledge or experience to. {Middle English …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 16 induct — transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin inductus, past participle of inducere, from Latin Date: 14th century 1. to put in formal possession (as of a benefice or office) ; install < was inducted as president of the college > …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 17 induct — verb a) to formally or ceremoniously install in an office, position, et cetera. b) to introduce into (particularly if certain knowledge or experience is required, such as ritual adulthood or cults) …

    Wiktionary

  • 18 induct — Synonyms and related words: anoint, bring up, broach, call up, chair, christen, commandeer, conscript, crown, detach, detach for service, draft, enlist, enroll, enthrone, establish, float, found, impress, inaugurate, initiate, install, instate,… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 19 induct — I (Roget s IV) v. Syn. conscript, initiate, draft; see enlist 1 , recruit 1 . II (Roget s 3 Superthesaurus) v. bring in, install, instate, swear in, inaugurate. III (Roget s Thesaurus II) verb 1. To admit formally into membership or office, as… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 20 induct — [[t]ɪndʌ̱kt[/t]] inducts, inducting, inducted 1) VERB If someone is inducted into a particular job, rank, or position, they are given the job, rank, or position in a formal ceremony. [FORMAL] [be V ed into n] Six new members have been inducted… …

    English dictionary