incriminate

  • 1 incriminate — in·crim·i·nate /in kri mə ˌnāt/ vt nat·ed, nat·ing 1: to charge with involvement in a crime he was incriminated in the conspiracy 2: to suggest or show involvement of in a crime among the evidence that incriminated him was a box of trigge …

    Law dictionary

  • 2 incriminate — (v.) 1730, back formation from incrimination or else from M.L. incriminatus, pp. of incriminare to incriminate, from in in (see IN (Cf. in ) (2)) + criminare to accuse of a crime, from crimen (gen. criminis) crime (see CRIME ( …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 3 Incriminate — In*crim i*nate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Incriminated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Incriminating}.] [LL. incriminatus, p. p. of incriminare; in in + criminare, criminari, to accuse one of a crime. See {Criminate}.] To accuse; to charge with a crime or fault;… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 incriminate — impeach, indict, *accuse, charge, arraign Analogous words: *involve, implicate Contrasted words: *exculpate, exonerate, absolve, acquit, vindicate …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 5 incriminate — [v] accuse allege, attack, attribute, blame, brand, bring charges, charge, cite, finger*, frame, hold accountable, implicate, inculpate, indict, involve, name, pin on*, point the finger at*, prosecute, serve summons; concept 44 …

    New thesaurus

  • 6 incriminate — ► VERB ▪ make (someone) appear guilty of a crime or wrongdoing. DERIVATIVES incrimination noun incriminatory adjective. ORIGIN Latin incriminare accuse , from crimen crime …

    English terms dictionary

  • 7 incriminate — [in krim′i nāt΄] vt. incriminated, incriminating [< ML incriminatus, pp. of incriminare: see IN 1 & CRIMINATE] 1. to charge with a crime; accuse 2. to involve in, or make appear guilty of, a crime or fault incrimination n. incriminatory [in… …

    English World dictionary

  • 8 incriminate — UK [ɪnˈkrɪmɪneɪt] / US [ɪnˈkrɪmɪˌneɪt] verb [transitive] Word forms incriminate : present tense I/you/we/they incriminate he/she/it incriminates present participle incriminating past tense incriminated past participle incriminated to show or make …

    English dictionary

  • 9 incriminate — v. (D; tr.) to incriminate in * * * [ɪn krɪmɪneɪt] (D; tr.) to incriminate in …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 10 incriminate — in|crim|i|nate [ınˈkrımıneıt] v [T] [Date: 1700 1800; : Late Latin; Origin: , past participle of incriminare, from Latin crimen; CRIME] to make someone seem guilty of a crime incriminate yourself ▪ He refused to answer questions for fear he might …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 11 incriminate — incrimination, n. incriminator, n. incriminatory /in krim euh neuh tawr ee, tohr ee/, adj. /in krim euh nayt /, v.t., incriminated, incriminating. 1. to accuse of or present proof of a crime or fault: He incriminated both men to the grand jury. 2 …

    Universalium

  • 12 incriminate — verb a) To accuse or bring criminal charges against. The newpapers are all incriminating me unjustly in this fiasco! b) To indicate the guilt of. We have all sorts of evidence which incriminate you …

    Wiktionary

  • 13 incriminate — in|crim|i|nate [ ın krımı,neıt ] verb transitive to show or make you think that someone is guilty of a crime: Be careful you don t say anything to incriminate yourself. No incriminating evidence was found. ╾ in|crim|i|na|tion [ ın,krımı neıʃn ]… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 14 incriminate — [[t]ɪnkrɪ̱mɪneɪt[/t]] incriminates, incriminating, incriminated VERB If something incriminates you, it suggests that you are responsible for something bad, especially a crime. [V n] He claimed that the drugs had been planted to incriminate him …

    English dictionary

  • 15 incriminate — verb (T) to make someone seem guilty of a crime: He refused to speak because he was worried that he would incriminate himself. | incriminating evidence incrimination /In krImi neISFn/ noun (U) …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 16 incriminate — /ɪnˈkrɪməneɪt / (say in krimuhnayt) verb (t) (incriminated, incriminating) 1. to imply or provide evidence of the fault of (someone): incriminating evidence; her statement incriminated them both. 2. to involve in an accusation; implicate:… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 17 incriminate — /inkrimaneyt/ To charge with crime; to expose to an accusation or charge of crime; to involve oneself or another in a criminal prosecution or the danger thereof; as, in the rule that a witness is not bound to give testimony which would tend to… …

    Black's law dictionary

  • 18 incriminate — /inkrimaneyt/ To charge with crime; to expose to an accusation or charge of crime; to involve oneself or another in a criminal prosecution or the danger thereof; as, in the rule that a witness is not bound to give testimony which would tend to… …

    Black's law dictionary

  • 19 incriminate — transitive verb ( nated; nating) Etymology: Late Latin incriminatus, past participle of incriminare, from Latin in + crimin , crimen crime Date: circa 1736 to charge with or show evidence or proof of involvement in a crime or fault •… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 20 incriminate — Synonyms and related words: accuse, arraign, assail, attack, blame, censure, charge, criminate, cry out against, cry out on, cry shame upon, entangle, finger, impeach, implicate, impugn, inculpate, indict, involve, tax …

    Moby Thesaurus