inconstancy

  • 1 Inconstancy — In*con stan*cy, n. [L. inconstantia.] The quality or state of being inconstant; lack of constancy; mutability; fickleness; variableness. [1913 Webster] For unto knight there was no greater shame, Than lightness and inconstancie in love. Spenser.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 inconstancy — index disloyalty, inconsistency, infidelity, lapse (expiration), revolt Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 3 inconstancy — (n.) 1520s, from L. inconstantia (see INCONSTANCE (Cf. inconstance)) …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 4 inconstancy — noun Lack of constancy; lack of consistency in thought, emotion or action. Although she loved him for many years, his inconstancy eventually drove her to another …

    Wiktionary

  • 5 inconstancy —    promiscuity    Used of those with regular sexual partners:     Inconstancy was so much the rule among the British residents in Cairo, the place, she thought, was a bureau of sexual exchange. (Manning, 1978) …

    How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms

  • 6 inconstancy — inconstant ► ADJECTIVE ▪ frequently changing; variable or irregular. DERIVATIVES inconstancy noun …

    English terms dictionary

  • 7 inconstancy — noun Date: 1526 the quality or state of being inconstant …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 8 inconstancy — in·con·stan·cy (ĭn kŏnʹstən sē) n. pl. in·con·stan·cies 1. The state or quality of being eccentrically variable or fickle. 2. An instance of being eccentrically variable or fickle. * * * …

    Universalium

  • 9 inconstancy — Synonyms and related words: Punic faith, ambitendency, ambivalence, arrhythmia, bad faith, barratry, breach of faith, breach of promise, breach of trust, brokenness, capriciousness, change of mind, changeability, changeableness, choppiness,… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 10 inconstancy — in·con·stan·cy || ɪn kÉ‘nstÉ™nsɪ / kÉ’n n. lack of constancy, changeability, fickleness …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 11 inconstancy — n. 1. Changeableness, fickleness, vacillation, wavering, unsteadiness. 2. Unstableness, instability, mutability, variableness …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 12 inconstancy — in·constancy …

    English syllables

  • 13 inconstancy — See: inconstant …

    English dictionary

  • 14 inconstancy — noun 1. the quality of being changeable and variable • Syn: ↑changefulness • Ant: ↑constancy • Derivationally related forms: ↑changeful (for: ↑changefulness), ↑ …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 15 somatic inconstancy — somatic inconstancy. См. соматическая анеуплоидия. (Источник: «Англо русский толковый словарь генетических терминов». Арефьев В.А., Лисовенко Л.А., Москва: Изд во ВНИРО, 1995 г.) …

    Молекулярная биология и генетика. Толковый словарь.

  • 16 Double Inconstancy — La Double Inconstance Title page from the first edition of La Double Inconstance Written by Pierre de Marivaux Characters …

    Wikipedia

  • 17 inconstant — inconstancy, n. inconstantly, adv. /in kon steuhnt/, adj. not constant; changeable; fickle; variable: an inconstant friend. [1375 1425; late ME inconstaunt < L inconstant (s. of inconstans) changeable. See IN 3, CONSTANT] Syn. moody, capricious,… …

    Universalium

  • 18 Oxford Dictionary of Proverbs, Thematic Index — absence absence makes the heart grow fonder he who is absent is always in the wrong the best of friends must part blue are the hills that are far away distance lends enchantment to the view out of sight, out of mind …

    Proverbs new dictionary

  • 19 Counterpart theory — In philosophy, specifically in the area of modal metaphysics, counterpart theory is an alternative to standard (Kripkean) possible worlds semantics for interpreting quantified modal logic. Counterpart theory still presupposes possible worlds, but …

    Wikipedia

  • 20 constance — [ kɔ̃stɑ̃s ] n. f. • v. 1220 sens 2; de constant 1 ♦ (v. 1265) Vieilli Force morale, fermeté d âme. ⇒ courage. Endurer son mal avec constance. « La constance n est elle pas la plus haute expression de la force ? » (Balzac). 2 ♦ Littér.… …

    Encyclopédie Universelle