imputing

  • 1 Imputing — Impute Im*pute , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Imputed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Imputing}.] [F. imputer, L. imputare to bring into the reckoning, charge, impute; pref. im in + putare to reckon, think. See {Putative}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To charge; to ascribe; to …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 imputing — im·pute || ɪm pjuːt v. attribute, ascribe, credit; charge, accuse, blame …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 3 imputing blame — index incriminatory, inculpatory Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 4 Imputation (statistics) — For other uses of imputation , see Imputation (disambiguation). In statistics, imputation is the substitution of some value for a missing data point or a missing component of a data point. Once all missing values have been imputed, the dataset… …

    Wikipedia

  • 5 Sola fide — (Latin: by faith alone), also historically known as the doctrine of justification by faith, is a doctrine that distinguishes most Protestant denominations from Catholicism, Eastern Christianity, and most Restorationists in Christianity.The… …

    Wikipedia

  • 6 Dark liquidity — Financial markets Public market Exchange Securities Bond market Fixed income Corporate bond Government bond Municipal bond …

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  • 7 Sanctifying Grace — • Treatise on this fundamental building block of Christianity Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Sanctifying Grace     Sanctifying Grace      …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 8 dishonor — dis·hon·or 1 n: refusal on the part of the issuer (as a bank) to pay or accept commercial paper (as a check) when it is presented see also wrongful dishonor dishonor 2 vt: to refuse to pay or accept a bank dishonor ing the checks for insufficient …

    Law dictionary

  • 9 Ascription — As*crip tion, n. [L. ascriptio, fr. ascribere. See {Ascribe}.] The act of ascribing, imputing, or affirming to belong; also, that which is ascribed. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 10 Imputation — Im pu*ta tion, [L. imputatio an account, a charge: cf. F. imputation.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act of imputing or charging; attribution; ascription; also, anything imputed or charged. [1913 Webster] Shylock. Antonio is a good man. Bassanio. Have… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 11 Impute — Im*pute , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Imputed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Imputing}.] [F. imputer, L. imputare to bring into the reckoning, charge, impute; pref. im in + putare to reckon, think. See {Putative}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To charge; to ascribe; to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 12 Imputed — Impute Im*pute , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Imputed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Imputing}.] [F. imputer, L. imputare to bring into the reckoning, charge, impute; pref. im in + putare to reckon, think. See {Putative}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To charge; to ascribe; to …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 13 Inculpatory — In*cul pa*to*ry, a. Imputing blame; causing blame to be imputed to; criminatory; compromising; implicating. Opposite of {exculpatory}. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 14 Pejorative — Pe*jor a*tive, a. [F. p[ e]joratif, fr. L. pejor, used as compar. of malus evil.] Implying or imputing evil; depreciatory; disparaging; unfavorable. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 15 imputation — noun Date: 1581 1. the act of imputing: as a. attribution, ascription b. accusation < denied any imputation of unfairness > c. insinuation 2. something imputed • imputative adjective • imputatively …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 16 impute — transitive verb (imputed; imputing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French imputer, from Latin imputare, from in + putare to consider Date: 14th century 1. to lay the responsibility or blame for often falsely or unjustly 2. to credit to a… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 17 lie — I. intransitive verb (lay; lain; lying) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English licgan; akin to Old High German ligen to lie, Latin lectus bed, Greek lechos Date: before 12th century 1. a. to be or to stay at rest in a horizontal position ;… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 18 Defamation — This article is about the malicious statement. For the 2009 film, see Defamation (film). Libel and Slander redirect here. For other uses, see Libel (disambiguation) and Slander (disambiguation). Vilification and Calumny redirect here. For the… …

    Wikipedia

  • 19 First Amendment to the United States Constitution — First Amendment redirects here. For other uses, see First Amendment (disambiguation). United States of America This a …

    Wikipedia

  • 20 Lucretius — Infobox Philosopher region = Western Philosophy era = Hellenistic philosophy color = #B0C4DE image size = 200px image caption = Lucretius (artist s impression) name = Titus Lucretius Carus birth = ca. 99 BC death = ca. 55 BC school tradition =… …

    Wikipedia