implicate

  • 1 implicate — im·pli·cate / im plə ˌkāt/ vt cat·ed, cat·ing: to involve as a consequence, corollary, or natural inference firing the federal employee because of her protest implicate s the First Amendment Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster.… …

    Law dictionary

  • 2 Implicate — Im pli*cate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Implicated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Implicating}.] [L. implicatus, p. p. of implicare to involve; pref. im in + plicare to fold. See {Employ}, {Ply}, and cf. {Imply}, {Implicit}.] 1. To infold; to fold together; to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 implicate — (v.) early 15c., to convey in a fable; c.1600, intertwine, wreathe, from L. implicatus, pp. of implicare to involve, entwine (see IMPLICATION (Cf. implication)). Meaning involve a person in a crime, charge, etc., is from 1797. Related:… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 4 implicate — *involve Analogous words: *concern, affect: incriminate (see ACCUSE) Contrasted words: *exculpate, absolve, acquit, exonerate …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 5 implicate — [v] imply, involve accuse, affect, associate, blame, charge, cite, compromise, concern, connect, embroil, entangle, frame, hint, impute, include, incriminate, inculpate, insinuate, lay at one’s door*, link, mean, mire, name, pin on*, point finger …

    New thesaurus

  • 6 implicate — ► VERB 1) show to be involved in a crime. 2) (be implicated in) bear some of the responsibility for. 3) convey (a meaning or intention) indirectly; imply. DERIVATIVES implicative adjective. ORIGIN Latin implicare fold in, involve, imply …

    English terms dictionary

  • 7 implicate — [im′pli kāt΄] vt. implicated, implicating [< L implicatus, pp. of implicare, to enfold, involve: see IMPLY] 1. a) to show to have a connection with a crime, fault, etc.; involve b) to show to be involved or concerned 2. Rare to imply …

    English World dictionary

  • 8 implicate — v. (D; tr.) to implicate in (to implicate smb. in a scandal) * * * [ ɪmplɪkeɪt] (D; tr.) to implicate in (to implicate smb. in a scandal) …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 9 implicate — verb (T) 1 to show or seem to show that someone is involved in something wrong or criminal: implicate sb in sth: The letter seemed to implicate Mitchell in the robbery. 2 to show or seem to show that something is the cause of something bad or… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 10 implicate — UK [ˈɪmplɪkeɪt] / US [ˈɪmplɪˌkeɪt] verb [transitive, often passive] Word forms implicate : present tense I/you/we/they implicate he/she/it implicates present participle implicating past tense implicated past participle implicated 1) to show or… …

    English dictionary

  • 11 implicate — [[t]ɪ̱mplɪkeɪt[/t]] implicates, implicating, implicated VERB To implicate someone means to show or claim that they were involved in something wrong or criminal. → See also implicated [V n in n] Allegations had appeared in the press implicating… …

    English dictionary

  • 12 implicate — verb a) To connect or involve in an unfavorable or criminal way with something. The evidence implicates involvement of top management in the scheme. b) To imply, to have as a necessary consequence or accompaniment. What did Nixons visit to China… …

    Wiktionary

  • 13 implicate — verb be implicated in sth ADVERB ▪ deeply, heavily, strongly ▪ These groups are very strongly implicated in the violence. ▪ directly ▪ falsely …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 14 implicate — im|pli|cate [ˈımplıkeıt] v [T] [Date: 1400 1500; : Latin; Origin: , past participle of implicare to twist together, make complicated ] 1.) to show or suggest that someone is involved in a crime or dishonest act ▪ The allegations implicated Abe to …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 15 implicate — im|pli|cate [ ımplı,keıt ] verb transitive often passive 1. ) to show or suggest that someone is involved in something illegal or morally wrong: implicate someone in something: Three top officials have been implicated in the scandal. 2. ) to make …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 16 implicate — transitive verb ( cated; cating) Etymology: Middle English, to convey by implication, from Medieval Latin implicatus, past participle of implicare, from Latin, to entwine, involve more at employ Date: 15th century 1. to involve as a consequence,… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 17 implicate — adj. [L. implicare, to entangle] To infold or twist together …

    Dictionary of invertebrate zoology

  • 18 implicate — /im pli kayt /, v.t., implicated, implicating. 1. to show to be also involved, usually in an incriminating manner: to be implicated in a crime. 2. to imply as a necessary circumstance, or as something to be inferred or understood. 3. to connect… …

    Universalium

  • 19 implicate — Synonyms and related words: absorb, affect, allegorize, allude to, assail, associate, assume, attack, ball up, bring, bring to mind, call for, catch up in, censure, complicate, comprise, concern, confound, confuse, connect, connote, contain,… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 20 implicate — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) v. t. involve, entangle, embroil; incriminate; connect, associate. See accusation, inclusion, difficulty. II (Roget s IV) v. Syn. involve, connect, cite, impute, associate, tie up with, charge,… …

    English dictionary for students


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