house+of+correction

  • 1 House of correction — Correction Cor*rec tion (k?r r?k sh?n), n. [L. correctio: cf. F. correction.] 1. The act of correcting, or making that right which was wrong; change for the better; amendment; rectification, as of an erroneous statement. [1913 Webster] The due… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 house of correction — house of correction: an institution where persons who have committed minor offenses and who are considered capable of reformation are confined compare house of detention, jail, lockup, penitentiary …

    Law dictionary

  • 3 house of correction — n. a place of short term confinement for persons convicted of minor offenses and regarded as capable of being reformed …

    English World dictionary

  • 4 House of Correction — The House of Correction was a type of building built after the passing of the Elizabethan Poor Law (1601). Houses of correction were places where those who were unwilling to work including vagrants and beggars were set to work. The building of… …

    Wikipedia

  • 5 house of correction —    a prison    So named in the hope that there will be no recidivism. The American house of detention is specific:     Lyburn... is unlike any other house of correction in the world. (Ustinov, 1971)     Incarceration in the House of Detention… …

    How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms

  • 6 house of correction — house′ of correc′tion n. soc a place for the confinement and reform of persons convicted of minor offenses • Etymology: 1625–35 …

    From formal English to slang

  • 7 house of correction — (Roget s Thesaurus II) noun A place for the confinement of persons in lawful detention: brig, jail, keep, penitentiary, prison. Informal: lockup, pen3. Slang: big house, can, clink, cooler, coop, hoosegow, joint, jug, pokey1, slammer, stir2.… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 8 house of correction — An institution for the reception and care of orphans, indigent, wayward, incorrigible, or vicious youths, children whose parents are incapable or unworthy, and, in some instances, adults, such as unfortunate or abandoned women, first offenders,… …

    Ballentine's law dictionary

  • 9 house of correction — Date: circa 1576 a penal institution for persons convicted of a minor offense and considered capable of reformation …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 10 house of correction — a place for the confinement and reform of persons convicted of minor offenses and not regarded as confirmed criminals. [1625 35] * * * …

    Universalium

  • 11 house of correction — noun A residential penitentiary facility, an institution where criminals or wayward people (notably youth) are sent to have their ways corrected trough a penal regime officially intended to reeducate them …

    Wiktionary

  • 12 house of correction — institution for the confinement and reform of persons convicted of minor offenses …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 13 house of correction — noun historical an institution where vagrants and minor offenders were confined and set to work …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 14 house of correction — Bridewell, workhouse, prison for petty offenders …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 15 house of correction — noun (formerly) a jail or other place of detention for persons convicted of minor offences • Hypernyms: ↑jail, ↑jailhouse, ↑gaol, ↑clink, ↑slammer, ↑poky, ↑pokey …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 16 Maryland House of Correction — Coordinates: 39°08′37″N 76°46′39″W / 39.143735°N 76.777429°W / 39.143735; 76.777429 The Mar …

    Wikipedia

  • 17 Correction — Cor*rec tion (k?r r?k sh?n), n. [L. correctio: cf. F. correction.] 1. The act of correcting, or making that right which was wrong; change for the better; amendment; rectification, as of an erroneous statement. [1913 Webster] The due correction of …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 18 Correction line — Correction Cor*rec tion (k?r r?k sh?n), n. [L. correctio: cf. F. correction.] 1. The act of correcting, or making that right which was wrong; change for the better; amendment; rectification, as of an erroneous statement. [1913 Webster] The due… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 19 correction — mid 14c., action of correcting, from O.Fr. correccion (13c.) correction, amendment; punishment, rebuke, from L. correctionem (nom. correctio), noun of action from correct , pp. stem of corrigere (see CORRECT (Cf. correct)). Meaning chastisement… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 20 correction — cor·rec·tion n 1: a decline in market price or business activity following and counteracting a rise 2: the treatment and rehabilitation of offenders through a program involving penal custody, parole, and probation often used in pl.… …

    Law dictionary


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