hostile+incursion

  • 1 Incursion — In*cur sion, n. [L. incursio: cf. F. incursion. See {Incur}.] [1913 Webster] 1. A running into; hence, an entering into a territory with hostile intention; a temporary invasion; a predatory or harassing inroad; a raid. [1913 Webster] The Scythian …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 incursion — (n.) hostile attack, early 15c., from M.Fr. incursion (14c.) or directly from L. incursionem (nom. incursio) a running against, noun of action from pp. stem of incurrere (see INCUR (Cf. incur)) …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 3 incursion — I noun advancement, aggression, assault, attack, breach, encroachment, entrance, foray, forced entry, hostile entrance, incursio, infiltration, influx, infringement, ingress, ingression, inroad, introgression, intrusion, invasion, irruption,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 4 hostile entrance — index incursion Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 5 incursion — noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French, from Latin incursion , incursio, from incurrere Date: 15th century 1. a hostile entrance into a territory ; raid 2. an entering in or into (as an activity or undertaking) …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 6 incursion — /in kerr zheuhn, sheuhn/, n. 1. a hostile entrance into or invasion of a place or territory, esp. a sudden one; raid: The bandits made brief incursions on the village. 2. a harmful inroad. 3. a running in: the incursion of sea water. [1400 50;… …

    Universalium

  • 7 incursion — I. /ɪnˈkɜʒən / (say in kerzhuhn) noun 1. a hostile entrance into or invasion of a place or territory, especially one of sudden character; raid; attack. 2. a harmful inroad. 3. a running in: the incursion of sea water. {Middle English, from Latin… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 8 incursion — in·cur·sion || ɪn kÉœrÊ’n / kɜːʃn n. hostile invasion, attack, raid; infiltration, entering, coming in …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 9 incursion — in•cur•sion [[t]ɪnˈkɜr ʒən, ʃən[/t]] n. 1) a hostile entrance into or invasion of a place or territory; raid 2) an inroad; penetration • Etymology: 1400–50; late ME < L incursiō, der. (with tiō tion) of incurrere; see incur …

    From formal English to slang

  • 10 foreign incursion laws — plural noun a set of laws which proscribe anyone coming into Australia for hostile purposes or anyone in the country supporting hostile activities; Australians fighting overseas for government forces are not committing an offence but Australians… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 11 invasion — invasion, incursion, raid, inroad are comparable when meaning an entrance effected by force or strategy. Invasion basically implies entrance upon another s territory with such hostile intentions as conquest, plunder, or use as a basis of… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 12 foray — n. Inroad, irruption, raid, piratical invasion, hostile incursion, predatory incursion …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 13 Decursion — De*cur sion, n. [L. decursio, fr. decurrere. See {Decurrent}.] A flowing; also, a hostile incursion. [Obs.] Sir M. Hale. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 14 Flank — (fl[a^][ng]k), n. [F. flanc, prob. fr. L. flaccus flabby, with n inserted. Cf. {Flaccid}, {Flanch}, {Flange}.] 1. The fleshy or muscular part of the side of an animal, between the ribs and the hip. See Illust. of {Beef}. [1913 Webster] 2. (Mil.)… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 15 Flank attack — Flank Flank (fl[a^][ng]k), n. [F. flanc, prob. fr. L. flaccus flabby, with n inserted. Cf. {Flaccid}, {Flanch}, {Flange}.] 1. The fleshy or muscular part of the side of an animal, between the ribs and the hip. See Illust. of {Beef}. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 16 Flank company — Flank Flank (fl[a^][ng]k), n. [F. flanc, prob. fr. L. flaccus flabby, with n inserted. Cf. {Flaccid}, {Flanch}, {Flange}.] 1. The fleshy or muscular part of the side of an animal, between the ribs and the hip. See Illust. of {Beef}. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 17 Flank defense — Flank Flank (fl[a^][ng]k), n. [F. flanc, prob. fr. L. flaccus flabby, with n inserted. Cf. {Flaccid}, {Flanch}, {Flange}.] 1. The fleshy or muscular part of the side of an animal, between the ribs and the hip. See Illust. of {Beef}. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 18 Flank en potence — Flank Flank (fl[a^][ng]k), n. [F. flanc, prob. fr. L. flaccus flabby, with n inserted. Cf. {Flaccid}, {Flanch}, {Flange}.] 1. The fleshy or muscular part of the side of an animal, between the ribs and the hip. See Illust. of {Beef}. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 19 Flank files — Flank Flank (fl[a^][ng]k), n. [F. flanc, prob. fr. L. flaccus flabby, with n inserted. Cf. {Flaccid}, {Flanch}, {Flange}.] 1. The fleshy or muscular part of the side of an animal, between the ribs and the hip. See Illust. of {Beef}. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 20 Flank march — Flank Flank (fl[a^][ng]k), n. [F. flanc, prob. fr. L. flaccus flabby, with n inserted. Cf. {Flaccid}, {Flanch}, {Flange}.] 1. The fleshy or muscular part of the side of an animal, between the ribs and the hip. See Illust. of {Beef}. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English