gripe+or+grip

  • 1 Grip — Grip, n. [AS. gripe. Cf. {Grip}, v. t., {Gripe}, v. t.] 1. An energetic or tenacious grasp; a holding fast; strength in grasping. [1913 Webster] 2. A peculiar mode of clasping the hand, by which members of a secret association recognize or greet …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 grip — grip1 [grip] n. [ME gripe < OE gripa, a clutch, handful < base of grīpan: see GRIPE] 1. the act of taking firmly and holding fast with the hand, teeth, an instrument, etc.; secure grasp; firm hold 2. the manner in which this is done 3. any… …

    English World dictionary

  • 3 Grip — Grip, v. t. [From {Grip} a grasp; or P. gripper to seize; of German origin. See {Gripe}, v. t.] To give a grip to; to grasp; to gripe. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 Gripe — Gripe, n. 1. Grasp; seizure; fast hold; clutch. [1913 Webster] A barren scepter in my gripe. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. That on which the grasp is put; a handle; a grip; as, the gripe of a sword. [1913 Webster] 3. (Mech.) A device for grasping or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 Gripe penny — Gripe Gripe, n. 1. Grasp; seizure; fast hold; clutch. [1913 Webster] A barren scepter in my gripe. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. That on which the grasp is put; a handle; a grip; as, the gripe of a sword. [1913 Webster] 3. (Mech.) A device for grasping …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6 gripe — grīp vb, griped; grip·ing vt to cause pinching and spasmodic pain in the bowels of vi to experience gripes gripe n a pinching spasmodic intestinal pain usu. used in pl. * * * n. severe abdominal pain (see colic) …

    Medical dictionary

  • 7 Gripe — Gripe, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Griped}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Griping}.] [AS. gripan; akin to D. grijpen, G. greifen, OHG. gr?fan, Icel. gripa, Sw. gripe, Dan. gribe, Goth. greipan; cf. Lith. graibyti, Russ. grabite to plunder, Skr. grah, grabh, to seize …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8 gripe — [n1] complaint ache, aching, affliction, disorder, distress, grievance, groan, grouse, grumble, illness, indisposition, infirmity, moan, objection, pain, pang; concepts 52,278,313 Ant. compliment, flattery, praise gripe [n2] strong hold clamp,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 9 grip — [n1] clasp, embrace anchor, brace, catch, cinch, cincture, clamp, clamping, clench, clinch, clutch, coercion, constraint, crushing, duress, enclosing, enclosure, fastening, fixing, grapnel, grapple, grasp, gripe, handclasp, handgrip, handhold,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 10 gripe — (v.) O.E. gripan grasp at, lay hold, attack, take, seek to get hold of, from P.Gmc. *gripanan (Cf. O.S. gripan, O.N. gripa, Du. grijpen, Goth. greipan, O.H.G. grifan, Ger. greifen to seize ), from PIE root *ghreib to grip (Cf. Lith. griebiu …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 11 gripe — ► VERB 1) informal express a trivial complaint; grumble. 2) affect with stomach or intestinal pain. ► NOUN 1) informal a trivial complaint. 2) pain in the stomach or intestines; colic. ORIGIN Old English, «grasp, clutch»; related to GRIP …

    English terms dictionary

  • 12 gripe — [grīp] vt. griped, griping [ME gripen < OE grīpan, to seize, akin to Ger greifen < IE base * ghreib , to grasp, akin to base of GRAB] 1. Archaic a) to grasp; clutch b) to distress; oppress; afflict 2. to cause sudden, sharp pain in the… …

    English World dictionary

  • 13 gripe —  , grip  a little ditch. N …

    A glossary of provincial and local words used in England

  • 14 grip — {{11}}grip (n.) fusion of O.E. gripe grasp, clutch and gripa handful, sheaf (see GRIP (Cf. grip) (v.)). Meaning stage hand is from 1888, from their work shifting scenery. {{12}}grip (v.) O.E. grippan to grip, seize, obtain (class I strong verb;… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 15 grip — [[t]grɪp[/t]] n. v. gripped, grip•ping 1) the act of grasping; a seizing and holding fast; firm grasp 2) the power of gripping: to have a strong grip[/ex] 3) a grasp, hold, or control: in the grip of fear; Get a grip on yourself[/ex] 4) mental or …

    From formal English to slang

  • 16 grip — gripless, adj. /grip/, n., v., gripped or gript, gripping. n. 1. the act of grasping; a seizing and holding fast; firm grasp. 2. the power of gripping: He has a strong grip. 3. a grasp, hold, or control. 4. mental or intellectual hold: to have a… …

    Universalium

  • 17 grip — /grɪp / (say grip) noun 1. the act of grasping; a seizing and holding fast; firm grasp: the grip of a vice. 2. the power of gripping. 3. a grasp, hold or control: *Hugo held her hand in an iron grip –martin boyd, 1946. 4. a handle or hilt. 5. a… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 18 gripe — griper, n. gripeful, adj. gripingly, adv. /gruyp/, v., griped, griping, n. v.i. 1. Informal. to complain naggingly or constantly; grumble. 2. to suffer pain in the bowels. 3. Naut. (of a sailing vessel) to tend to come into the wind; to be ardent …

    Universalium

  • 19 grip — [OE] Grip comes from a prehistoric Germanic verb *gripjan, derived from a base *grip . Variants of this base produced gripe [OE] (which originally meant simply ‘grasp’), grope [OE], and possibly also grab. French borrowed it as gripper ‘seize’,… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 20 grip — verb (grips, gripping, gripped) 1》 take and keep a firm hold of. 2》 (of an emotion or situation) have a strong or adverse effect on.     ↘[often as adjective gripping] hold the attention or interest of. noun 1》 a firm hold.     ↘effective control …

    English new terms dictionary