free+from+superfluity

  • 1 terse — a. Concise (with elegance), brief, compact, neat, pithy, sententious, succinct, free from superfluity, polished, smooth …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 2 architecture — /ahr ki tek cheuhr/, n. 1. the profession of designing buildings, open areas, communities, and other artificial constructions and environments, usually with some regard to aesthetic effect. Architecture often includes design or selection of… …

    Universalium

  • 3 W. H. R. Rivers — Photograph of Rivers taken by Henry Maull Born 12 March 1864(1864 03 12) …

    Wikipedia

  • 4 softness — noun 1. the property of giving little resistance to pressure and being easily cut or molded (Freq. 2) • Ant: ↑hardness • Derivationally related forms: ↑soft • Hypernyms: ↑consistency, ↑consistence, ↑ …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 5 Wikipedia:Featured article candidates — Here, we determine which articles are to be featured articles (FAs). FAs exemplify Wikipedia s very best work and satisfy the FA criteria. All editors are welcome to review nominations; please see the review FAQ. Before nominating an article,… …

    Wikipedia

  • 6 KABBALAH — This entry is arranged according to the following outline: introduction general notes terms used for kabbalah the historical development of the kabbalah the early beginnings of mysticism and esotericism apocalyptic esotericism and merkabah… …

    Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • 7 music — musicless, adj. /myooh zik/, n. 1. an art of sound in time that expresses ideas and emotions in significant forms through the elements of rhythm, melody, harmony, and color. 2. the tones or sounds employed, occurring in single line (melody) or… …

    Universalium

  • 8 Russian literature — Introduction       the body of written works produced in the Russian language, beginning with the Christianization of Kievan Rus in the late 10th century.       The unusual shape of Russian literary history has been the source of numerous… …

    Universalium

  • 9 Talmudical Hermeneutics — (Hebrew: approximately, מידות שהתורה נדרשת בהן) refers to the science which defines the rules and methods for the investigation and exact determination of the meaning of the Scriptures, both legal and historical. Since the Halakah, however, is… …

    Wikipedia

  • 10 symphony — /sim feuh nee/, n., pl. symphonies. 1. Music. a. an elaborate instrumental composition in three or more movements, similar in form to a sonata but written for an orchestra and usually of far grander proportions and more varied elements. b. an… …

    Universalium

  • 11 Talmud and Midrash — ▪ Judaism Introduction       commentative and interpretative writings that hold a place in the Jewish religious tradition second only to the Bible (Old Testament). Definition of terms       The Hebrew term Talmud (“study” or “learning”) commonly… …

    Universalium

  • 12 Baroque architecture — Façade of the Church of the Gesù, the first truly baroque façade.[1] Baroque architecture is a term used to describe the building style of the Baroque era, begun in late sixteenth century Italy, that took the Roman vocabulary of Renaissance… …

    Wikipedia

  • 13 The Idler (1758–1760) — This article is about the 18th century series of essays. For other publications called The Idler, see The Idler (disambiguation). The Idler was a series of 103 essays, all but twelve of them by Samuel Johnson, published in the London weekly the… …

    Wikipedia

  • 14 fat — fatless, adj. fatlike, adj. /fat/, adj., fatter, fattest, n., v., fatted, fatting. adj. 1. having too much flabby tissue; corpulent; obese: a fat person. 2. plump; well fed: a good, fat chicken. 3. consisting of or containing fat; greasy; oily:… …

    Universalium

  • 15 Sumptuary law — Sumptuary laws (from Latin sumptuariae leges ) are laws which attempt to regulate habits of consumption. Black s Law Dictionary defines them as Laws made for the purpose of restraining luxury or extravagance, particularly against inordinate… …

    Wikipedia

  • 16 Historicism — refers to philosophical theories that include one or both of two claims:# that there is an organic succession of developments, a notion also known as historism (in German historismus ), and/or; # that local conditions and peculiarities influence… …

    Wikipedia

  • 17 lack — vb Lack, want, need, require are comparable when meaning to be without something, especially something essential or greatly to be desired. Lack may imply either an absence or a shortage in the supply or amount of that something {the house lacks a …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms