fickleness

  • 1Fickleness — Fic kle*ness, n. The quality of being fickle; instability; inconsonancy. Shak. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2fickleness — index disloyalty, indecision, infidelity Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 3fickleness — fickle UK US /ˈfɪkl/ adjective ► likely to change suddenly and without warning: »Do Americans know how to invest in fickle markets? »The art market is as fickle and hard to predict as any other. ► likely to change your opinion or your feelings… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 4fickleness — fickle ► ADJECTIVE ▪ changeable, especially as regards one s loyalties. DERIVATIVES fickleness noun. ORIGIN Old English, «deceitful» …

    English terms dictionary

  • 5fickleness — noun see fickle …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 6fickleness — See fickle. * * * …

    Universalium

  • 7fickleness — noun The quality of being fickle …

    Wiktionary

  • 8fickleness — fick·le·ness || fɪklnɪs n. inconsistency, changeableness; lack of constancy in one s affections …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 9fickleness — n 1. capriciousness, fancifulness, giddiness, facetiousness; changeableness, mutability, moodiness; impulsiveness, impetuosity, erraticalness. 2. indecision, uncertainty, irresolution, wishy washiness. 3. inconstancy, unfaithfulness, disloyalty;… …

    A Note on the Style of the synonym finder

  • 10fickleness — fick·le·ness …

    English syllables

  • 11fickleness — noun unfaithfulness by virtue of being unreliable or treacherous • Syn: ↑faithlessness, ↑falseness, ↑inconstancy • Derivationally related forms: ↑inconstant (for: ↑inconstancy), ↑fickle, ↑ …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 12fickle — fickleness, n. /fik euhl/, adj. 1. likely to change, esp. due to caprice, irresolution, or instability; casually changeable: fickle weather. 2. not constant or loyal in affections: a fickle lover. [bef. 1000; ME fikel, OE ficol deceitful, akin to …

    Universalium

  • 13Epistle to the Galatians —     Epistle to the Galatians     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► Epistle to the Galatians     GALATIA     In the course of centuries, gallic tribes, related to those that invaded Italy and sacked Rome, wandered east through Illyricum and Pannonia. At… …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 14Instabilities — Instability In sta*bil i*ty, n.; pl. {Instabilities}. [L. instabilitas: cf. F. instabilit[ e].] [1913 Webster] 1. The quality or condition of being unstable; lack of stability, firmness, or steadiness; liability to give way or to fail;… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 15Instability — In sta*bil i*ty, n.; pl. {Instabilities}. [L. instabilitas: cf. F. instabilit[ e].] [1913 Webster] 1. The quality or condition of being unstable; lack of stability, firmness, or steadiness; liability to give way or to fail; insecurity;… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 16Croesus — For the opera, see Croesus (opera). Croesus Receiving Tribute from a Lydian Peasant, by Claude Vignon. Croesus (   …

    Wikipedia

  • 17Number Eight (Battlestar Galactica) — This article is about the characters from the reimagining of Battlestar Galactica; for the original characters, see Lieutenant Boomer and Lieutenant Athena. Number Eight Sharon Boomer Valerii Sharon Athena Agathon Battlestar Galactica character …

    Wikipedia

  • 18English words first attested in Chaucer — Contents 1 Etymology 2 List 2.1 Canterbury Tales General Prologue …

    Wikipedia

  • 19fickle — UK US /ˈfɪkl/ adjective ► likely to change suddenly and without warning: »Do Americans know how to invest in fickle markets? »The art market is as fickle and hard to predict as any other. ► likely to change your opinion or your feelings suddenly… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 20Floure and the Leaf, The — (ca. 1460–1480)    The Floure and the Leaf is a 595 line MIDDLE ENGLISH poem in RHYME ROYAL stanzas that was formerly attributed to Geoffrey CHAUCER, but is certainly too late to be his. The great Chaucerian scholar W.W. Skeat included it in his… …

    Encyclopedia of medieval literature