exert+one's+self

  • 1exert one's self — Labor, toil, strive, try, endeavor, work, take pains, bestir one s self, fall to work, work with a will, leave no stone unturned, do one s best, make effort, make great efforts …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 2To exert one's self — Exert Ex*ert , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Exerted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Exerting}.] [L. exertus, exsertus, p. p. of exerere, exserere, to thrust out; ex out + serere to join or bind together. See {Series}, and cf. {Exsert}.] 1. To thrust forth; to emit;… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3bestir one's self — Labor, work, toil, strive, be alert, hasten, lose no time, be lively, look alive, fall to work, exert one s self, rouse one s self, trouble one s self, busy one s self, take pains, be busy, be active, be quick, bear a hand …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 4To lay hands on one's self — Lay Lay (l[=a]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Laid} (l[=a]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Laying}.] [OE. leggen, AS. lecgan, causative, fr. licgan to lie; akin to D. leggen, G. legen, Icel. leggja, Goth. lagjan. See {Lie} to be prostrate.] 1. To cause to lie down,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5To lay one's self open to — Lay Lay (l[=a]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Laid} (l[=a]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Laying}.] [OE. leggen, AS. lecgan, causative, fr. licgan to lie; akin to D. leggen, G. legen, Icel. leggja, Goth. lagjan. See {Lie} to be prostrate.] 1. To cause to lie down,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6To lay one's self out — Lay Lay (l[=a]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Laid} (l[=a]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Laying}.] [OE. leggen, AS. lecgan, causative, fr. licgan to lie; akin to D. leggen, G. legen, Icel. leggja, Goth. lagjan. See {Lie} to be prostrate.] 1. To cause to lie down,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7To lay violent hands on one's self — Lay Lay (l[=a]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Laid} (l[=a]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Laying}.] [OE. leggen, AS. lecgan, causative, fr. licgan to lie; akin to D. leggen, G. legen, Icel. leggja, Goth. lagjan. See {Lie} to be prostrate.] 1. To cause to lie down,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8To endeavor one's self — Endeavor En*deav or, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Endeavored}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Endeavoring}.] [OE. endevor; pref. en + dever, devoir, duty, F. devoir: cf. F. se mettre en devoir de faire quelque chose to try to do a thing, to go about it. See {Devoir},… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 9To serve one's self of — Serve Serve, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Served}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Serving}.] [OE. serven, servien, OF. & F. servir, fr. L. servire; akin to servus a servant or slave, servare to protect, preserve, observe; cf. Zend har to protect, haurva protecting. Cf …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 10lay one's self forth or out — Strive, labor, try, struggle, exert one s self, put forth all one s strength, do one s utmost …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 11To pain one's self — Pain Pain, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pained} (p[=a]nd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Paining}.] [OE. peinen, OF. pener, F. peiner to fatigue. See {Pain}, n.] 1. To inflict suffering upon as a penalty; to punish. [Obs.] Wyclif (Acts xxii. 5). [1913 Webster] 2. To… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 12Exert — Ex*ert , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Exerted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Exerting}.] [L. exertus, exsertus, p. p. of exerere, exserere, to thrust out; ex out + serere to join or bind together. See {Series}, and cf. {Exsert}.] 1. To thrust forth; to emit; to push …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 13Self-esteem — In psychology, self esteem reflects a person s overall evaluation or appraisal of her or his own worth.Self esteem encompasses beliefs (for example, I am competent/incompetent ) and emotions (for example, triumph/, pride/shame). Behavior may… …

    Wikipedia

  • 14Self control — is perceived in a few ways. One of which is philosophical and might be described as the exertion of one s own will on one s personal self their behaviors, actions, thought processes. Much of this comes from the perception of self and the ability… …

    Wikipedia

  • 15Self-organization — is a process of attraction and repulsion in which the internal organization of a system, normally an open system, increases in complexity without being guided or managed by an outside source. Self organizing systems typically (though not always)… …

    Wikipedia

  • 16Self-assembly — is a term used to describe processes in which a disordered system of pre existing components forms an organized structure or pattern as a consequence of specific, local interactions among the components themselves, without external direction.Self …

    Wikipedia

  • 17Self-regulated learning — The term self regulated can be used to describe learning that is guided by metacognition (thinking about one s thinking), strategic action (planning, monitoring, and evaluating personal progress against a standard), and motivation to learn… …

    Wikipedia

  • 18One Power — In The Wheel of Time fantasy series by Robert Jordan, the One Power is the force that maintains the continuous motion of the Wheel of Time. It comes from the True Source, and it is separated into two halves: saidin /saɪˈd …

    Wikipedia

  • 19To serve one out — Serve Serve, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Served}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Serving}.] [OE. serven, servien, OF. & F. servir, fr. L. servire; akin to servus a servant or slave, servare to protect, preserve, observe; cf. Zend har to protect, haurva protecting. Cf …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 20To serve one right — Serve Serve, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Served}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Serving}.] [OE. serven, servien, OF. & F. servir, fr. L. servire; akin to servus a servant or slave, servare to protect, preserve, observe; cf. Zend har to protect, haurva protecting. Cf …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English