evict

  • 1evict — /i vikt/ vt [Medieval Latin evictus, past participle of evincere to recover (property) by legal process, from Latin, to vanquish, regain possession of]: to put (a tenant) out of property by force, by virtue of a paramount title, or esp. by legal… …

    Law dictionary

  • 2evict — e‧vict [ɪˈvɪkt] verb [transitive] LAW to legally force someone to leave the house they are living in or land they are living on: • They were evicted from their home for not paying the rent. eviction noun [countable, uncountable] : • Foreclosure… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 3Evict — E*vict , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Evicted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Evicting}.] [L. evictus, p. p. of evincere to overcome completely, evict. See {Evince}.] 1. (Law) To dispossess by a judicial process; to dispossess by paramount right or claim of such… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4evict — evict; evict·ee; …

    English syllables

  • 5evict — mid 15c., recover (property) by judicial means, from L. evictus, pp. of evincere recover property, overcome and expel, conquer, from ex out (see EX (Cf. ex )) + vincere conquer (see VICTOR (Cf. victor)). Sense of expel by legal process first… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 6evict — *eject, oust, expel, dismiss Analogous words: *exclude, eliminate, shut out: reject, repudiate, spurn (see DECLINE): *dismiss, fire, cashier, discharge …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 7evict — [v] throw out from residence boot out*, bounce*, chase, dislodge, dismiss, dispossess, eject, expel, extrude, force out, heave ho*, kick out*, oust, out, put out, remove, send packing*, show out, show the door*, shut out, toss out on ear*, turn… …

    New thesaurus

  • 8evict — ► VERB ▪ expel (someone) from a property, especially with the support of the law. DERIVATIVES eviction noun. ORIGIN from Latin evincere overcome, defeat …

    English terms dictionary

  • 9evict — [ē vikt′, ivikt′] vt. [ME evicten < L evictus, pp. of evincere, EVINCE] to remove (a tenant) from leased premises by legal procedure, as for failure to pay rent SYN. EJECT eviction n …

    English World dictionary

  • 10evict — verb ADVERB ▪ forcibly ▪ unlawfully (esp. BrE) VERB + EVICT ▪ attempt to, seek to, try to, want to …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 11evict — v. (D; tr.) to evict from * * * [ɪ vɪkt] (D; tr.) to evict from …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 12evict — [15] Ultimately, evict and evince [17] are the same word, although they have diverged considerably over the centuries. Both come from Latin ēvincere, a compound verb formed from the prefix ex ‘out’ and vincere (source of English victory). This… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 13evict — UK [ɪˈvɪkt] / US verb [transitive] Word forms evict : present tense I/you/we/they evict he/she/it evicts present participle evicting past tense evicted past participle evicted to legally force someone to leave the house they are living in,… …

    English dictionary

  • 14evict — [15] Ultimately, evict and evince [17] are the same word, although they have diverged considerably over the centuries. Both come from Latin ēvincere, a compound verb formed from the prefix ex ‘out’ and vincere (source of English victory). This… …

    Word origins

  • 15evict — e|vict [ıˈvıkt] v [T] [Date: 1500 1600; : Latin; Origin: , past participle of evincere; EVINCE] to tell someone legally that they must leave the house they are living in evict sb from sth ▪ They were unable to pay the rent, and were evicted from… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 16evict — verb expel (someone) from a property, especially with the support of the law. Derivatives eviction noun evictor noun Origin ME (in the sense recover property by legal process ): from L. evict , evincere overcome, defeat …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 17evict — v.tr. expel (a tenant) from a property by legal process. Derivatives: eviction n. evictor n. Etymology: L evincere evict (as E , vincere conquer) …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 18evict — transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin evictus, past participle of evincere, from Latin, to vanquish, win a point more at evince Date: 15th century 1. a. to recover (property) from a person by legal process b. to put (a… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 19evict — eviction, n. evictor, n. /i vikt /, v.t. 1. to expel (a person, esp. a tenant) from land, a building, etc., by legal process, as for nonpayment of rent. 2. to recover (property, titles, etc.) by virtue of superior legal title. [1400 50; late ME… …

    Universalium

  • 20evict — verb To expel (one or more people) from their property; to force (one or more people) to move out. See Also: eviction …

    Wiktionary